Tag Archives: Marijuana

Peer-reviewed Study Shows Cannabis Compounds Block Covid-19 from Entering Human Cells

Matt Agorist 
January 13, 2022

As many folks are quickly learning, no amount of police state can stop the spread of COVID-19. Despite lockdowns, mask mandates, social distancing, and unethical forced medical procedures, the US and Europe are experiencing the largest wave of coronavirus yet. Even the criminal Dr. Fauci has since admitted that omicron will “find just about everybody.”

What’s more, contrary to the hype — all of which turned out to be false — that the vaccine would save us, end the pandemic, and stop covid dead in its tracks, the exact opposite has happened. Highlighting the sheer insanity of this rollout is the fact that as the Supreme Court deliberated whether or not OSHA can force workers to take the jab, the CEO of Pfizer, whose jab is being mandated, came out and said it provides “very limited protection, if any” against the virus.

As the house of cards crumbles with mandates, lockdowns, and the covid police state failing in a beautiful splendor, Team Doom is now walking back their stance, throwing their hands in the air, and realizing that no amount of tyranny can stop a virus. As it should have been this entire time, it is up to you to weigh the risks and make the appropriate choices to protect yourself and your family from a disease which, if most people catch, will be entirely fine.

The good news is that some of these choices are easy. Staying healthy, eating right, and exercising are some of the best ways you can protect yourself from the virus — although the state will tell you to do the opposite. And, if you want to go further, a new study out of Oregon State University showed that compounds found in hemp “show the ability to prevent the virus that causes COVID-19 from entering human cells.”

The study was led by Richard van Breemen, a researcher with Oregon State’s Global Hemp Innovation Center in the College of Pharmacy and Linus Pauling Institute. According to OSU:

Van Breemen and collaborators, including scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, found that a pair of cannabinoid acids bind to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, blocking a critical step in the process the virus uses to infect people.

The compounds are cannabigerolic acid, or CBGA, and cannabidiolic acid, CBDA, and the spike protein is the same drug target used in COVID-19 vaccines and antibody therapy. A drug target is any molecule critical to the process a disease follows, meaning its disruption can thwart infection or disease progression.

“These cannabinoid acids are abundant in hemp and in many hemp extracts,” van Breemen said. “They are not controlled substances like THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, and have a good safety profile in humans. And our research showed the hemp compounds were equally effective against variants of SARS-CoV-2, including variant B.1.1.7, which was first detected in the United Kingdom, and variant B.1.351, first detected in South Africa.”

“Any part of the infection and replication cycle is a potential target for antiviral intervention, and the connection of the spike protein’s receptor binding domain to the human cell surface receptor ACE2 is a critical step in that cycle,” he said. “That means cell entry inhibitors, like the acids from hemp, could be used to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection and also to shorten infections by preventing virus particles from infecting human cells. They bind to the spike proteins so those proteins can’t bind to the ACE2 enzyme, which is abundant on the outer membrane of endothelial cells in the lungs and other organs.”

According to Van Breen similar compounds have been used to block virus-receptor interaction in patients with other viral infections including HIV-1 and hepatitis.

“These compounds can be taken orally and have a long history of safe use in humans,” van Breemen said. “They have the potential to prevent as well as treat infection by SARS-CoV-2. CBDA and CBGA are produced by the hemp plant as precursors to CBD and CBG, which are familiar to many consumers. However, they are different from the acids and are not contained in hemp products.”

This study is preceded by a similar study we reported on out of the University of Chicago, in which researchers discovered that another particular cannabis compound inhibits infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in human lung cells.

Marsha Rosner and her colleagues from the university found cannabidiol (CBD) and its metabolite 7-OH-CBD potently blocked SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung epithelial cells.

TFTP has reported on a third study as well, out of Canada, in which researchers found that certain strains of cannabis may also increase resistance to the coronavirus.

As the state fails the people once again, the perfect irony can be found in the fact that a plant — which they still claim has ” no currently accepted medical use” — is doing a better job than them at stopping the virus.

Washington State’s Marijuana Tax Has Raised More than $3b

Brett Davis, The Center Square
January 8, 2022

Washington state’s tax coffers are much higher because of legal marijuana.

That’s according to a recent report by the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), a Washington, D.C.-based group advocating for legal reforms on cannabis. The report looks at tax revenue generated from state-legal, adult-use cannabis since 2014 when sales began in Colorado and Washington state.

For every $1 billion in revenue collected from the state’s cannabis retail tax, nearly $600 million is funneled into public health initiatives, including a fund that provides health insurance for low-income families.

Marijuana is big business Washington, one of 18 states with laws that legalize, tax, and regulate cannabis for adults 21 and older. In Washington state, a 37% excise tax is levied on the retail transaction price. The state levies a 6.5% sales tax.

Washington state collected an estimated $480.9 million in marijuana tax revenue through the first nine months of 2021, not counting millions more in local taxes levied by cities and towns where recreational pot is sold in retail establishments, according to the report. Local taxes totaled an estimated $188.3 million from July 2014 through October 2021, per the report.

In 2020, the figure for statewide marijuana tax revenue was an estimated $614.5 million, and in 2019 it was $477.3 million. The Evergreen State collected a higher amount of tax revenue from legal marijuana than the state did from alcohol in those two fiscal years, the report notes.

During the June 2014–October 2021 time period, marijuana tax revenue is estimated to have filled state coffers with more than $3 billion.

Washington is a pot-pioneering state. It became one of the first two states, along with Colorado, to legalize adult recreational use of marijuana when voters passed Initiative 502 on Nov. 6, 2012.

Marijuana has since become more mainstream than ever, not just in Washington state but throughout the nation, if the money generated by legal weed is any indication.

As of December 2021, states reported a combined total of $10.4 billion in tax revenue from legal, adult-use cannabis sales, with more than $3 billion reported so far for last year, according to the report.

The other 16 states that legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana are Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Virginia.

Continue Reading

Historic Bill to Legalize Cannabis Across the US Faces House Vote this Month


ELIAS MARAT
SEP 2, 2020

Historic legislation that would comprehensively put an end to the federal prohibition of cannabis and roll back the damages done by the failed “War on Drugs” will be put to a vote in the U.S. House when it returns from its August recess.

The vote will hit the floor on the week of September 21, according to House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD).

In November, the House Judiciary passed HR 3884—the M******** Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act or MORE Act – on a bipartisan vote, but it has since been waiting for action by the full House.

The MORE Act, introduced by Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), would lead to the removal of cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act, where it is currently scheduled as a Class 1 controlled substance. It would drive the final nail into the coffin of prohibition on a national level and allowing states to move forward with their own policies regulating the commerce and consumption of the plant.

Likewise, banks would have the ability to offer credit cards and checking accounts to legal cannabis businesses, and the study of any potential medicinal benefits of the plant would be easier to undertake.

The act also requires federal courts to expunge past cannabis convictions and authorizes the provision of resources, through a tax on cannabis products, toward addressing the needs of communities who have suffered serious negative impacts from prohibition enforcement, especially those communities of color that have suffered disproportionate over-policing and mass incarceration.

The announcement by House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., was welcomed by advocates for the legalization of cannabis.

“After many months of hard work and collaboration, we finally have a chance to end the failed policy of prohibition that has resulted in a long and shameful period of selective enforcement against people of color, especially Black men,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), co-chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus.

“As people across the country protest racial injustices, there’s even greater urgency for Congress to seize this historic opportunity and finally align our cannabis laws with what the majority of Americans support, while ensuring restorative justice,” Rep. Blumenauer added.

The MORE Act was initially opposed by Republicans, including many who supported a separate bipartisan cannabis reform bill called the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act.

However, the MORE Act goes much further than the STATES Act, which lacked the social equity elements and formal removal of cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act.

“It’s the first-ever comprehensive m*****na legalization bill to ever be considered for a full House floor vote,” said Queen Adesuyi, national affairs policy manager for the Drug Policy Alliance.

The removal of cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act as a Schedule I narcotic would mean that the plant would no longer be defined by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a drug “with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse” in league with LSD and her***.

While five Senate Republicans have co-sponsored the STATES Act, none have added their names to the More Act.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) was an original co-sponsor of the More Act and has put forward his own M******** Justice Act.

“This war on pot has not been a war on pot,” Booker said last year. “It has been a war on Black people and brown people and low income people. This is not about legalization of marij*****. That’s too simplistic. This is about restorative justice. It’s about equal justice under the law.”

Thriving Hemp Industry is About to Create a Jobs Boom in the US

Originally published on May 29, 2019 at 11:28 pm
Written by 
Emma Fiala

Thanks to a provision in the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp is no longer a federally illegal controlled substance in the Unites States. The passage of the Farm Bill allows farmers and cultivators to grow the once demonized cannabis plant and even restart long forgotten operations.

As it turns out, legally allowing farmers to grow the plant and sell it to processors is having a massive effect on employment in the United States, across multiple sectors. The hemp industry took in $1.1 billion in revenue in 2018 and is on track to more than double that in 2022, with $2.6 billion in revenue, according to New Frontier Data.

The effects of the hemp boom will be felt far from the agriculture fields and even the hemp processors, with job growth expected in the form of “accountants, lawyers, compliance officers, government regulators, IT specialists, financial and insurance experts, transporters, researchers and lab technicians, marketers, CFOs, CEOs and various retail employees,” according to CNBC.

Job creation is going to happen in every economic bracket,” said the executive director of the DC-based National Hemp Association, Erica McBride Stark.

The hemp industry will create high-skilled management jobs, labor-type jobs and everything in between. It’s going to touch all of society.”

Stark recently returned from the 6th annual NoCo Hemp Expo in Denver, Colorado. More than 225 exhibitors and 10,000 attendees were present—twice the size of last year’s gather.

Indeed, the online job listing search engine, reported an increase in job openings in hemp-related industries this year and HempStaff has seen hemp related jobs double in the last year.

And while hemp is federally legal in the United States, only 41 states allowed the cultivation of hemp as of February and only 24 states had farmers actually growing it last year, which means there is plenty of room for growth and expansion. According to NBC, “Total hemp acreage in the U.S. was at 78,176 acres, up from 25,713 in 2017,” with the average increasingly considerably over the next few years.

It should be noted, too, that despite hemp’s new federal status, the Farm Bill stipulates that individual states can choose to establish their own agriculture and commerce programs, or not. As of February, 41 states allowed cultivation of hemp for commercial, research or pilot programs, although only 24 states had farmers actually growing hemp last year.

While hemp can be used for a wide variety of things including textiles, building materials, and food, the primary focus and most trending use of the plant is for producing CBD oil. CBD oil is made from the flowers, buds, and seeds of the hemp plant.

CBD oil is a non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid found in cannabis plants. It has been shown to aid users in treating anxiety, arthritis, pain, depression, and more and is being used with increasingly frequency to relieve pain associated with cancer and cancer treatment and in an attempt to treat the cancer itself.

In 2018 alone, CBD-containing products generated $390 million in sales in the U.S. and that number is predicted to reach $1.3 billion by 2022.

Presently, an epilepsy drug called Epidiolex is the only CBD product approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration even though a wide array of CBD products are available online and over-the-counter at mainstream stores like Walgreens, CVS, and Bed Bath and Beyond. The FDA is still finalizing regulations associated with those products and has a public hearing scheduled for May 31 in Silver Spring, MD.

According to the FDA, the agency is “concerned” about the rapid increase in CBD-containing products “marketed for therapeutic or medical uses.”

The agency has and will continue to monitor the marketplace and take action as needed to protect the public health against companies illegally selling cannabis and cannabis-derived products that can put consumers at risk and that are being marketed for therapeutic uses for which they are not approved. At the same time, FDA recognizes the potential therapeutic opportunities that cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds could offer and acknowledges the significant interest in these possibilities.”

Despite the FDA’s concern, all signs point to a continued booming of the hemp industry, with CBD products leading the way. “Whereas legal marijuana is expansively regulated — from seed to sale, as they say in the cannabis world — hemp will enjoy less stringent oversight, since its no longer classified as a drug, potentially attracting a much wider variety of established and start-up companies,” reports NBC.

Joy Beckerman, president of the Hemp Industries Association, predicts:

Hemp is going to dwarf marijuana for jobs. There are so many companies looking for people right now with industry experience and talent.”

Hemp is here to stay,” said one farmer who transitioned 40 acres of his tobacco farm to hemp, “This is not some fad.”