Tag Archives: Food Crisis

Is The U.S. Going To Transition From Stagflation Directly Into A Full-Blown Economic Depression?

By Michael Snyder

Should the fact that the U.S. economy actually contracted during the first quarter actually surprise any of us?  Since the start of 2022, there has been crisis after crisis, and now the war in Ukraine is depressing economic activity all over the planet.  What we are facing could most definitely be described as a “perfect storm”, and the truth is that this storm isn’t going to go away anytime soon.  But where do we go from here?  Will the U.S. economy bounce back, or will this new economic downturn soon become even worse?  Most economic optimists are assuming that the former will be true, while many economic realists are issuing dire warnings about what is ahead.

I was actually thinking of writing about something else today, but I knew that my regular readers would want me to talk about this

Gross domestic product unexpectedly declined at a 1.4% annualized pace in the first quarter, marking an abrupt reversal for an economy coming off its best performance since 1984, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

The negative growth rate missed even the subdued Dow Jones estimate of a 1% gain for the quarter, but the initial estimate for Q1 was the worst since the pandemic-induced recession in 2020.

We already knew that inflation had started to spiral out of control in the United States, and now the “stag” part of “stagflation” has arrived.

So what caused this “sudden” downturn?  According to CNN, there are quite a few factors that can be blamed…

A push by the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates and combat high inflation. Supply chain shortages. An ongoing global health crisis. And of course, the geopolitical earthquake caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which is also threatening to create a world food crisis.

If the U.S. economy shrinks again in the second quarter, that will officially meet the definition of a “recession”.

But as John Williams of shadowstats.com has pointed out, if honest numbers were being used the U.S. economy would still be in a recession that started all the way back at the beginning of the COVID pandemic.

Everybody pretty much realizes that economic conditions are not great right now.

So are brighter days just around the corner?  That is what some pundits seem to think

The US economy will return to growth during the second quarter, according to RSM chief economist Joe Brusuelas. “Without a doubt,” he said.

“This is noise; not signal,” Pantheon Macroeconomics chief economist Ian Shepherdson wrote in a report. “The economy is not falling into recession.”

Maybe they will be right.

But if the economy is so strong, then why are foreclosure filings absolutely soaring?

Last month, 33,333 properties across the U.S. faced foreclosure, a 181 percent jump from March 2021 and 29 percent pop from February, according to a report by foreclosure tracker Attom. The first quarter saw 78,271 properties with a foreclosure filing, a 39 percent from the previous quarter and 132 percent from last year.

Needless to say, there are other experts that have a much more negative view on what is ahead.

For example, Nancy Lazar is warning of a “synchronized” global recession…

Piper Sandler chief global economist Nancy Lazar warned on Monday that the world is in the early stages of a “very significant” and “synchronized” recession.

In an appearance on “Mornings with Maria” Monday, Lazar noted that a recession is expected outside of the United States.

“It’s going to be a global recession pulling down [the] Euro zone in particular,” she told host Maria Bartiromo. “It looks like China GDP [Gross domestic product] in the second quarter could also be negative.”

Actually, if all we suffer is a significant global recession that will be really good news.

Because right at this moment inflation is dramatically spiking all over the globe, we are witnessing the largest land war in Europe since World War II, and the UN is telling us that we are heading into a horrific worldwide food crisis.

An increasing number of Americans are starting to realize that things are moving in the wrong direction.  In Gallup’s April survey, only 18 percent of Americans rated economic conditions as “good”, and only 2 percent rated them as “excellent”…

The GDP news comes on the heels of newly released polling data from Gallup that suggested that economy confidence is extremely low among the American public.

More than four in ten (42%) of Americans said that economic conditions in America were “poor,” while another 38% said that they were only “fair” in Gallup’s April survey. Just 2% said economic conditions were “excellent,” while 18% said they were “good.”

Those are terrible numbers, and they have very serious implications for the Democrats in the fall.

But instead of focusing on fixing the economy, Joe Biden wants Congress to give him another 33 billion dollars for the war in Ukraine…

President Joe Biden is asking Congress for another $33 billion to help Ukraine resist Russia’s invasion and provide humanitarian aid to the Ukrainian people.

The proposal, which the White House will send to lawmakers on Thursday, includes $20 billion in additional security and military assistance for Ukraine, another $8 billion for economic assistance and $3 billion in humanitarian aid.

This is complete and utter madness.

To put this in perspective, the military budget for Ukraine is normally about 6 billion dollars for an entire year.

And much of the equipment that the U.S. is sending to Ukraine is being blown up by the Russians before it can even get to the fighters on the frontlines.

With each passing day it is becoming clearer to everyone that this conflict is really a proxy war between the United States and Russia.

And nuclear war is increasingly becoming one of the hottest topics on Russian television.  For example, the following is a recent exchange between two Russian television personalities that is making headlines all over the globe…

“Everything will end with a nuclear strike is more probable than the other outcome,” she continued. “This is to my horror, on one hand, but on the other hand, with the understanding that it is what it is.”

It was at that point Solovyov chimed in, “But we will go to heaven, while they will simply croak.”

“We’re all going to die someday,” Simonyan agreed.

“We’re all going to die someday”?

I certainly don’t like the sound of that.

Unfortunately, many Russians are now entirely convinced that nuclear war is coming.

But instead of pushing for peace, Joe Biden and his minions just keep escalating the conflict.

If we continue to go down this path, it will end in a nightmare.

Our current economic problems pale in comparison to the possibility of a nuclear conflict, but most Americans still don’t understand the implications of the decisions that our leaders are making.

Because if they did understand, there would be giant protests in the streets of every single major U.S. city right now.

Global Food Crisis: IMF Warns of Unrest Amid Food Supply Shortages

PETER CADDLE
20 Apr 2022

The IMF has become the most recent global body to release a warning regarding potentially forthcoming global food shortages, saying that vulnerable nations are at risk of civil unrest amid supply issues.

Civil unrest linked to sky-high food prices is on the cards for poorer countries, the IMF has warned amid fears that the world could be heading into a global food crisis as a result of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

Amid past warnings of starvation and “Hell on Earth” migrant crises over a lack of food, the international finance body has predicted that growth across the world will be negatively affected, with poorer nations in particular to feel the brunt of the ongoing crisis.

According to a post on the organisation’s website, a mix of high inflation and supply problems are to greatly slow economic growth across the world, with vulnerable economies, in particular, to be hit with the brunt of the hardship.

“This crisis unfolds even as the global economy has not yet fully recovered from the pandemic,” the post penned by the group’s research department director, Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas.

“Even before the war, inflation in many countries had been rising due to supply-demand imbalances and policy support during the pandemic, prompting a tightening of monetary policy,” the piece continues. “In this context, beyond its immediate and tragic humanitarian impact, the war will slow economic growth and increase inflation.”

“Furthermore, increases in food and fuel prices may also significantly increase the prospect of social unrest in poorer countries,” it goes on to read. “Central banks will need to adjust their policies decisively to ensure that medium- and long-term inflation expectations remain anchored.”

What’s more, while the IMF report went into detail as to the near future effect of the current crisis for this year and the next, the globalist organisation appears to fear that issues surrounding food shortages could persist longer still.

Sky News reports the organisation as warning that food hoarding on the national level in Ukraine could further worsen the crisis and result in a longer-term humanitarian impact.

The IMF is far from the first international organisation warning about the rising price of food as a result of global supply shortages, with one UN group head even going so far as saying last month that a “Hell on Earth” migrant crisis could emerge out of the third world if more funds are not provided to aid agencies.

“Failure to provide this year a few extra billion dollars means you’re going to have famine, destabilization, and mass migration,” said ex-Republican Governor David Beasley, who now serves as the head of the World Food Bank.

“If you think we’ve got Hell on earth now, you just get ready,” the senior official continued. “If we neglect northern Africa, northern Africa’s coming to Europe. If we neglect the Middle East, [the] Middle East is coming to Europe.”

However, it is not just the global south that is likely to see problems with its food supply, with a lack of fertilisers sourced from Ukraine and Russia meaning that crop yields in the West could theoretically collapse by up to one half.

As a result, a number of national authorities in the West have taken notice of the issue, with Ireland for example pushing for more farmers to plant at least some grain crops over the coming year.

Other national officials have not been so enthusiastic, with one political leader in Scotland denying efforts to dampen supply problems in favour of her government’s green agenda.

What Is Going On? Union Pacific Railroad Begins Restricting Rail Shipments of Nitrogen Based Fertilizer During Spring Planting Season

Jim Hoft
April 18, 2022 

In early March, Tucker Carlson invited Iowa Corn and soybean farmer Ben Riensche on his top-rated program to discuss the massive inflation we are about to see in food prices here at home.

According to Rienshe, grocery prices may increase up to $1,000 per month due to Russia’s sanctions on fertilizer.

Transcript via Real Clear Politics.

“It’s embarrassing how little most people know about fertilizer, what it means, tell us the implications of this sanction?” Carlson asked.

“Soaring fertilizer prices are likely to spike food prices,” Riensche said. “If you’re upset that gas is up a dollar or two a gallon, wait until your grocery bill is up $1000 a month. And it may not manifest itself in terms of price, it could be quantity as well. Empty shelf syndrome must just be starting.”

“I’m sorry, I just wanted to make sure I heard you correctly. Up $1000 a month?” an incredulous Carlson asked.

“Sure,” Riensche responded. “The price of growing my crops, or the major crops, corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, cotton are up 30 to 40%. They are on my farm. And most of it is fertilizer. Nitrogen prices are up 3 times from the left crop we put in. Phosphorous and potassium have doubled.”

That was in March.

Now this…
A leading manufacturer of hydrogen and nitrogen products was informed Union Pacific rail lines were reducing and limiting shipments of fertilizer during the planting season this year.

Who made this decision?

CF Industries reported:

CF Industries Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: CF), a leading global manufacturer of hydrogen and nitrogen products, today informed customers it serves by Union Pacific rail lines that railroad-mandated shipping reductions would result in nitrogen fertilizer shipment delays during the spring application season and that it would be unable to accept new rail sales involving Union Pacific for the foreseeable future. The Company understands that it is one of only 30 companies to face these restrictions.

CF Industries ships to customers via Union Pacific rail lines primarily from its Donaldsonville Complex in Louisiana and its Port Neal Complex in Iowa. The rail lines serve key agricultural areas such as Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Texas and California. Products that will be affected include nitrogen fertilizers such as urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN) as well as diesel exhaust fluid (DEF), an emissions control product required for diesel trucks. CF Industries is the largest producer of urea, UAN and DEF in North America, and its Donaldsonville Complex is the largest single production facility for the products in North America.

“The timing of this action by Union Pacific could not come at a worse time for farmers,” said Tony Will, president and chief executive officer, CF Industries Holdings, Inc. “Not only will fertilizer be delayed by these shipping restrictions, but additional fertilizer needed to complete spring applications may be unable to reach farmers at all. By placing this arbitrary restriction on just a handful of shippers, Union Pacific is jeopardizing farmers’ harvests and increasing the cost of food for consumers.”

On Friday, April 8, 2022, Union Pacific informed CF Industries without advance notice that it was mandating certain shippers to reduce the volume of private cars on its railroad effective immediately. The Company was told to reduce its shipments by nearly 20%. CF Industries believes it will still be able to fulfill delivery of product already contracted for rail shipment to Union Pacific destinations, albeit with likely delays. However, because Union Pacific has told the Company that noncompliance will result in the embargo of its facilities by the railroad, CF Industries may not have available shipping capacity to take new rail orders involving Union Pacific rail lines to meet late season demand for fertilizer.

More here.

WEF’s Klaus Schwab Warns “Global Energy Systems, Food Systems and Supply Chains will Be Deeply Affected” (VIDEO)

Cristina Laila
Published March 31, 2022

Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum this week warned of global cyberattacks and worldwide disruptions with food and energy systems.

“History is truly at a turning point,” Klaus Schwab said at the 2022 World Government Summit.

“We do not yet know the full extent and the systemic structural changes which will happen, however, we do know the global energy systems, food systems, and supply chains will be deeply affected,” Schwab said speaking on the economic fallout from Covid-19, dangers of climate change and clashing world governments.

Klaus Schwab said the answer to the global food and energy crisis is to expand government power.

VIDEO:

Joe Biden last Thursday held a solo press conference in Brussels, Belgium amid meetings with NATO members.

Biden was asked if he discussed potential food shortages during his huddle with fellow members of NATO.

Joe Biden said there will be “real” food shortages in Europe and in the United States as a result of Putin invading Ukraine.

God help us.

Waste Not? Some States are Starting to Send Less Food to Landfills

By Elaine S. Povich

Prominent Northeastern grocery store chain Hannaford Supermarkets made headlines recently by declaring that for an entire year it had not sent any spoiled or outdated food to landfills, where the organic decomposition process produces methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases.

Instead, Hannaford, which operates in New England and New York, is contracting with an anaerobic food reprocesser to strip the food from its packaging, mix it with microbes and manure, and turn it into fuel, fertilizer, and bedding for dairy cows.

While bovines belching methane also is a climate problem, the Hannaford effort targets one of the leading sources of methane. Food waste in landfills produces the third largest amount of methane emissions in the United States (15%), after petroleum production (30%) and animal gas and manure (27%), according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

At least eight states, all in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic except California, have laws requiring some reprocessing of food waste, to keep it out of landfills and cut down on greenhouse gases, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

States have come up with a number of approaches to reduce food waste, especially the refuse bound for landfills. They include laws that require separation of food from other waste and incentives in the form of grants.

This year, state lawmakers have introduced at least 52 bills in 18 states involving food waste management, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Last year, 46 bills were introduced across 17 states and the District of Columbia. The waste management firm RTS noted that some states and cities including Tennessee and Washington, and Los Angeles and Madison, Wisconsin, have created food waste task forces.

Maryland and New Jersey are the latest to adopt similar laws. Maryland requires food facilities producing more than two tons of food waste a week to separate it from other waste and divert it from landfills by January 1, 2023. Facilities that produce one ton a week have until January 1, 2024. In both cases, the law applies only if the food originates within a 30 mile radius of a recycling facility.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, allowed the bill to become law without his signature.

Critics of the Maryland law argued that a mandate would be costly and called for letting market forces work things out. The Maryland Association of Counties opposed the bill because of worries over increased costs, especially to schools and prisons.

“Amidst a health pandemic and an accompanying fiscal uncertainty, counties are struggling to maintain service levels to meet essential needs — including in educational and correctional facilities. Placing an added cost burden onto those facilities will only divert resources. MACo believes that the bill should not apply to local government-owned facilities,” the organization said in written testimony during a hearing on the bill in January.

The state’s restaurant association fought the measure, too; the legislature ultimately exempted restaurants before passing the law, according to Wastedive, a trade publication.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, a Democrat, last year signed into law a requirement that producers of food waste such as hospitals, prisons, restaurants, and supermarkets recycle food garbage rather than send it to incinerators or landfills. The law will go into effect this fall.

The New Jersey Sierra Club, an environmental advocacy group, while generally praising the bill, criticized in a news release a loophole that allows the state Department of Environmental Protection to issue waivers, which the organization argued could be used to undermine the law’s intent.

The National Grocers Association has not taken a public position on disposal of food waste by independent grocery stores. In an email, Jim Dudlicek, director of communications for the trade group, noted it has 1,500 members whose stores are privately controlled. He did say, however, that some of its members have “innovative” programs for food waste, including Big Y stores, which divert food waste from landfills by donating usable food either to food banks or for animal feed, according to the company’s news release.

States Step Up

garbage truck dumping the garbage
iStock.com/choice76

Vermont is among the leaders in states that have “no landfill” laws for organic waste. The state has close to a full ban on organic waste in landfills, said Josh Kelly, materials management section manager for the state’s department of environmental conservation.

Any Vermont entity that produces more than one ton a week of organic waste must separate it from landfill trash and compost it, or reprocess it if there is a facility within a certain distance, he said. The initial statute was passed in 2012 and was just fully implemented in 2020, despite the pandemic.

“There was talk of delaying it because of the pandemic, but it was not delayed,” Kelly wrote in an email.

The law, combined with some grants from the state, has served to reset minds and procedures at large facilities, as well as in individuals, Kelly said in a phone interview. The idea, he said, is to get people to think, “it’s against the law to throw a banana peel in the trash,” before they toss it.

The state grants are funded by a fee of $6 a ton for regular trash.

By January 2022, California will require statewide collection and recycling of organic waste from all businesses and residents, including processing collected waste to become compost, clean electricity, or biofuel, according to Maria West, communications director for CalRecycle, the state’s recycling agency.

In an email, West said the goal of the law is to reduce organic waste sent to landfills by 75% by 2025.

She said the pandemic briefly interrupted recycling and reprocessing efforts as the state assessed the safety of workers who were separating waste items. But by June 2020, recycling was “deemed essential and safety protocols allowed separating to continue,” she said.

In addition, she said, the California law requires the state by 2025 to recover 20% of edible food otherwise sent to landfills to feed people in need.

Slow Moves

biogas plant with cows on a farm
iStock.com/CreativeNature_nl

Long ramp-up times in the effort to curb food in landfills are common even in the private sector, Hannaford health and sustainability expert George Parmenter said in a phone interview. His company had been taking smaller steps for many years to try to process food waste in the most environmentally friendly way possible, he said.

“We had a plan, eight or nine years ago, to work on food waste and get our arms around it and deal with it in a methodical way,” he said. At first, Hannaford stores sent their food waste to farms that composted it, but that also produces methane, and the facilities are generally smaller and scattered.

They eventually hit on Agri-Cycle Energy, an anaerobic food waste processor with a plant in Exeter, Maine. The key was the plant’s “de-packager” — automated equipment that freed store workers from having to scrape the spoiled food from the packaging, saving time and work hours. Hannaford is able to truck the spoiled food, packaging and all, to the plant.

Dan Bell, president and co-founder of Agri-Cycle, said the company began in 2011 and has grown annually. The Exeter site also includes a working dairy farm, owned by the family of Bell’s partner, Adam Wintle, providing a companion site for the use of the fertilizer and cow bedding produced.

The anaerobic process generates biofuel that runs the waste-processing engines. The company sells the extra power to electric companies, Bell said.

Because the process is contained in a building, he said, no odor escapes. The same cannot be said for the dairy farm, where manure smells are a fact of life, he acknowledged.

The company was helped by both federal and state grants for waste firms, which raised “a couple million” for the operation, Bell said. In addition, a power purchase agreement regulated by Maine assures that power produced will be bought by utilities, he said.

But Maine, unlike other New England states, does not have a law that requires food waste be kept out of landfills, according to Paula Clark, director of the division of materials management in the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

“We’ve talked about it from time to time,” she said in a phone interview. “We were not comfortable that Maine has sufficient capacity in composting or anaerobic digesting.” She added that the state is focused on providing grants and advice to help municipalities construct those facilities.

Donate First, Landfill Later

young people volunteering to sort donations for charity food drive
iStock.com/SDIProductions

Many grocery stores already donate outdated, but still edible, food to food banks. And some anti-hunger advocates argue that the focus on how to dispose of food waste diverts attention from the need for food that is past its expiration date to be donated.

Preventing food waste at the beginning of the supply chain is better for the world altogether than concentrating on what to do with what’s spoiled later, said Jennifer Molidor, senior food campaigner for the Center for Biological Diversity, a nonprofit environmental group based in California.

“Preventing food waste is much more environmentally useful than dealing with it later,” she said in a phone interview.

She said some grocery stores and other large food entities “greenwash” the issue by donating to environmental causes or just measuring how much food is wasted rather than putting their efforts into donations of edible food.

She called for stores to follow EPA’s food recovery hierarchy, which focuses on solutions at the top of the chart, especially food donations, to drastically cut the amount that is wasted. The hierarchy calls for cutting down on the amount of surplus food that’s produced, feeding hungry people with leftover usable food, then feeding animals, then using what’s in anaerobic processing, then composting, and finally, sending the rest to landfills.

“The No. 1 thing is prevention,” Molidor said. “If you don’t waste food, you don’t have to worry about landfills.”

Tell us in the comments:

  • Do you compost your food scraps?
  • Has your state or local jurisdiction put a food waste law in place?
  • What other ways can you keep food waste out of landfills?

WEF Issues Ominous Warning Over Coming Food Crisis, Recommends ‘More Sustainable Diets’

Did you see the ratio Bloomberg just earned for a tweet which recommends getting used to lentils instead of meat, switching to public transportation, and avoiding buying things in bulk?

The piece, written by economist Teresa Ghilarducci, recommends that families earning under $300,000 per year consider switching to public transportation, embracing a veggie diet, and “rethink those costly pet medical needs.” 

The intellectual heavyweight oddly retweeted someone slamming her advice.

Which is being parodied throughout social media…

Unsurprisingly, Ghilarducci and the far-left “New School for Social Research” she works for is affiliated with the World Economic Forum (WEF) – which, in addition to bragging about having ‘infiltrated‘ various world governments – infamously suggested that people get used to eating bugs due to inevitable food shortages, and

Yes, this WEF:

Which brings us to the WEF’s latest – warning of an impending food crisis kicked off by the war in Ukraine.

Key points:

  • More people around the world will go hungry as a result of the pandemic, high fuel prices and the conflict in Ukraine.
  • Russia and Ukraine are also major producers and suppliers of fertilizers and their raw materials.
  • Existing logistical issues with moving grain and food are likely to worsen.
  • Disruptions will put further pressure on this year’s harvest and lead to higher food prices.
  • Even before the pandemic, the FAO estimated that 690 million people or 9% of the world’s population, were facing food insecurity.

In short, the Ukraine war is accelerating the existing problem of inflation and food shortages, so hold on to your hats and consider a ‘more sustainable diet’ because things are about to get much, much worse.

We are currently witnessing the beginning of a global food crisis, driven by the knock-on effects of a pandemic and more recently the rise in fuel prices and the conflict in Ukraine. There were already clear logistical issues with moving grain and food around the globe, which will now be considerably worse as a result of the war. But a more subtle relationship sits with the link to the nutrients needed to drive high crop yields and quality worldwide.

In this context, calling for an immediate government intervention to the market is therefore the natural thing to do. Yet government budgets are severely stretched after COVID, leaving little room for direct monetary support and contribution. In view of the recent promises to remove all Russian oil and gas from our imports, there will be some tough decisions ahead for governments, farmers and consumers alike.

In the medium term, it highlights the need to transform our food system, using more green energy. We should also be encouraging more sustainable diets, which contain fewer grain fed animal products; and regenerative agricultural practices, which improve soil health and the efficiency of nutrient use by the crop. -WEF

So… eat the bugs and be happy?

Source: Zero Hedge

Will “Victory Gardens” Make Comeback As Global Food Crisis Worsens?

Spring in the Northern Hemisphere is two weeks away, and interest in planting gardens could rise as the breadbasket of Europe was choked off by the Russian invasions of Ukraine, jeopardizing global food exports resulting in skyrocketing prices.

Even before the turmoil in Ukraine, American households were under pressure due to soaring food and gas prices. The invasion just made things a lot worse, as commodity prices jumped the most last week since the stagflationary period of the mid-1970s.

New UN global food prices, released on Friday, showed global food prices in February surpassed a previous record set in 2011. About a quarter of the international wheat trade, about a fifth of corn, and 12% of all calories traded globally come from Ukraine and Russia. Food exports in the region have been halted due to conflict and sanctions.

This leaves us with a shrinking global food supply that may further increase prices. Since spring is just weeks away, Americans will be in for a shock at the supermarket as the latest round of food inflation makes it to the store shelves. To mitigate the impact of grocery bills tearing apart household finances — interest in farming and planting gardens could take off and help expand the food supply.

The US government highly encouraged the planting of ‘War Gardens,’ commonly known as ‘Victory Gardens,’ in the dark days of World War II. People planted gardens in backyards, empty lots, and even city rooftops — people pooled together their resources and harvested all sorts of diversified vegetables and fruit in the name of ‘patriotism.’

The most abundant crops of Victory Gardens were beans, beets, cabbage, carrots, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, peas, tomatoes, turnips, squash, and Swiss chard because they were easily canned and stored.

Victory Gardens are not a thing of the past and could soon be revitalized as food supply chains are disrupted as conflict breaks out in Eastern Europe.

E-Course: Bio-Intensive Gardening

While empty shelves and supply shortages are still a lingering side effect of the virus pandemic, the call by the American people for NATO to erect a “no-fly zone” to protect Ukraine from Russia soars, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll on Friday. Russian President Vladimir Putin said a no-fly zone would be considered ‘an act of war.’ For more on what a no-fly zone means, read: “Reality Check: A “No-Fly-Zone” Over Ukraine Means WW3.” 

Better start planting those Victory Gardens as spring is just two weeks away. Also, you might want to load up on bread at the supermarket as prices may jump.