Bernie Sanders Talks About False Flags and Government Sponsored Terror

SourceThe Daily Sheeple

(Peter Hasson) Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders once floated a conspiracy theory about the U.S. government orchestrating domestic bombings for political purposes.

Sanders launched his 1976 campaign for Vermont governor by suggesting that government agencies were behind a string of attempted bombings across the country.

Sanders ran on the Liberty Union ticket — a Vermont political party he co-founded — alongside lieutenant governor candidate John Franco, who also lent credence to the conspiracy theory.

Sanders and Franco “coupled the announcement with a disavowal of terrorist bombings and a charge that many such incidents may be instigated by government agencies to undermine legitimate efforts to bring about change,” the Bennington Banner, a Vermont newspaper, reported at the time.

Two days prior to Sanders’s announcement, eight letter bombs were sent to seven corporations and a business executive across four different cities. Authorities arrested two men, Leon Cordell Horton and Ardis Odell Reed, in 1981 for sending the bombs in what prosecutors said was an attempt to extort money from corporations. Both men were later found guilty.

The Banner’s story made clear the letter bombs and similar domestic attacks were the attacks to which Sanders and Franco reportedly referred as potentially orchestrated by the U.S. government. (Time Magazine noted in 2016 that “protest bombings in America were commonplace” during the 1970s.)

The Banner’s story stated both candidates denounced the “wave of letter bombings aimed at large corporations.”

“Both men said such terrorism is counterproductive to changing the ‘system,’ and charged that government agencies like the CIA may in fact be responsible,” read the Banner’s article, which The Daily Caller News Foundation reviewed in an online newspaper archive.

“Anybody that thinks change is going to come because of bombings or terrorist activity is either extremely stupid, crazy or an agent of the U.S. government,” the paper quoted Sanders saying.

“While [President] Donald Trump raves about a deep state coup and routinely invokes violence when discussing his political opponents, Senator Sanders is proud to have always supported peaceful political change,” a Sanders campaign spokeswoman told TheDCNF in an email.

A request for comment emailed to Franco received an automatic response saying he was out of office.

Attacking intelligence agencies has been a constant feature of Sanders’s political career.

At a 1974 Senate debate — two years prior to his promotion of the false flag conspiracy theory — Sanders said the CIA might be capable of overthrowing the U.S. government, the Banner reported in a contemporaneous article also reviewed by TheDCNF.

“Sanders called the CIA ‘a dangerous institution that has got to go,’ saying the CIA is ‘responsible to nobody except a handful of right-wing lunatics and the big multinational corporate interests,’” the paper reported.

“Sanders said that the CIA has overthrown many foreign governments unfriendly to the U.S. corporations and that they might even be able to overthrow the U.S. government if they chose to,” the Banner’s story added, noting that “Sanders was cheered at one point when he called for immediately disbanding of the CIA.”

When asked about his previous support for abolishing the CIA in 2016, Sanders said he no longer holds that position.

As recently as 2014, Sanders said that the intelligence agencies were “out of control.”

“As you have heard from me, for years now, in my view the intelligence agencies in this country, the [National Security Agency], CIA, are out of control,” he said in an interview.

“We certainly need to know about the torture practiced under the Bush administration and the CIA has got to understand that they work for the American people and the U.S. Congress, they are not an independent entity that can do whatever they want to do,” the Vermont senator added.

Predator Cops, Guilty of Sex Crimes Against Women and Children

(John W. Whitehead) How could this be happening right under our noses? That’s what readers wanted to know after my column went viral about the extent to which young children are being bought and sold for sex in America.Where are the police when these children—some as young as 9 years old—are being raped repeatedly?

Related US Police Refuse to Stop Creating Fake Profiles on Facebook

SourceWaking Times

by John W. Whitehead, April 30th, 2019

For that matter, what is the Trump Administration doing about the fact that adults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in suburbs, cities and towns across this nation?

I’ll tell you what the government is doing: little to nothing.

While America’s children are being menaced by sexual predators, the Trump Administration and its congressional cohorts continue to wage endless wars, run up the national debt, and distract the populace with vitriol and kabuki political theater.

The police are not much better.

In too many instances, the cops are worse.

Indeed, while there are certainly many good cops in this country—and I’ve had the honor of working with a number of them—the bad cops have become symptomatic of a criminal justice system that is deeply rotten through and through.

We can no longer count on police to save us from the worst in our society.

In many cases, rather than being part of the solution, America’s police forces—riddled with corruption, brutality, sexual misconduct and drug abuse—have largely become part of the problem. As the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “Hundreds of police officers across the country have turned from protectors to predators, using the power of their badge to extort sex.”

Let’s start with sex trafficking.

In a number of cases, victims of sex trafficking report that police are among those “buying” young girls and women for sex.

In other words, as a recent study by the State Commission on the Status of Women and Arizona State University makes clear, “victims are being exploited by the very people who are supposed to protect them: police officers.”

In New York, seven NYPD cops—three sergeants, two detectives and two officers—were accused of running brothels that sold 15-minute sexual encounters, raking in more than $2 million over the course of 13 months. Two of the cops, brothers, were charged with holding a bachelor party at one of the brothels where “they got the place for nothing and they used the prostitutes.”

In California, a police sergeant—a 16-year veteran of the police force—was arrested for raping a 16-year-old girl who was being held captive and sold for sex in a home in an upscale neighborhood.

A week-long sting in Florida ended with 277 arrests of individuals accused of sex trafficking, including doctors, pharmacists and police officers.

Sex trafficking victims in Hawaii described “cops asking for sexual favors to more coercive situations like I’ll let you go if you do X, Y, or Z for me.”

One study found that “over 14 percent of sex workers said that they had been threatened with arrest unless they had sex with a police officer.” In many states, it’s actually legal for police to have sex with prostitutes during the course of sting operations.

While the problem of cops engaged in sex trafficking is part of the American police state’s seedy underbelly that doesn’t get addressed enough, equally alarming is the number of cops who commit sex crimes against those they encounter as part of their job duties, a largely underreported number given the “blue wall of silence” that shields police misconduct.

Former Seattle police chief Norm Stamper describes cases in which cops fondled prisoners, made false traffic stops of attractive women, traded sexual favors for freedom, had sex with teenagers and raped children.

Young girls are particularly vulnerable to these predators in blue.

Former police officer Phil Stinson estimates that half of the victims of police sex crimes are minors under the age of eighteen.

According to The Washington Post, a national study found that 40 percent of reported cases of police sexual misconduct involved teens. One young woman was assaulted during a “ride along” with an officer, who said in a taped confession: “The badge gets you the p—y and the p—y gets your badge, you know?

For example, a Pennsylvania police chief and his friend were arrested for allegedly raping a young girl hundreds of times—orally, vaginally, and anally several times a week—over the course of seven years, starting when she was 4 years old.

In 2017, two NYPD cops were accused of arresting a teenager, handcuffing her, and driving her in an unmarked van to a nearby parking lot, where they raped her and forced her to perform oral sex on them, then dropped her off on a nearby street corner.

The New York Times reports that “a sheriff’s deputy in San Antonio was charged with sexually assaulting the 4-year-old daughter of an undocumented Guatemalan woman and threatening to have her deported if she reported the abuse.”

One young girl, J.E., was kidnapped by a Border Patrol agent when she was 14 years old, taken to his apartment and raped. “In the apartment, there were two beds on top of the other, children’s bunk beds, and ropes there, too. They were shoelaces. For my wrists and my feet. My mind was blank,” recalls J.E. “I was trying to understand everything. I didn’t know what to do. My feet were tied up. I would look at him and he had a gun. And that frightened me. I asked him why, and he answered me that he was doing this to me because I was the prettiest one of the three.”

Two teenage girls accused a Customs and Border Protection officer of forcing them to strip, fondling them, then trying to get them to stop crying by offering chocolates, potato chips and a blanket. The government settled the case for $125,000.

Mind you, this is the same government that has been separating immigrant children from their parents and locking them up in detention centers, where they are easy prey for sexual predators. So far, the government has received more than 4500 complaints about sexual abuse at those child detention facilities.

This is also the same government that “lost” almost 1500 migrant children. Who knows how many of those children ended up in the hands of traffickers?

The police state’s sexual assaults of children are sickening enough, but when you add sex crimes against grown women into the mix, the picture becomes even more sordid.

According to The Washington Post, “research on ‘police sexual misconduct’—a term used to describe actions from sexual harassment and extortion to forcible rape by officers—overwhelmingly concludes that it is a systemic problem.”

Investigative journalist Andrea Ritchie has tracked national patterns of sexual violence by police officers during traffic stops, in addition to heightened risk from minor offenses, drug arrests and police interactions with teenagers.

Victims of domestic abuse, women of color, transgender women, women who use drugs or alcohol, and women involved in the sex trade are particularly vulnerable to sexual assault by police.

One Oklahoma City police officer allegedly sexually assaulted at least seven women while on duty over the course of four months, including a 57-year-old grandmother who says she was forced to give the cop oral sex after he pulled her over.

A Philadelphia state trooper, eventually convicted of assaulting six women and teenagers, once visited the hospital bedside of a pregnant woman who had attempted suicide, and groped her breasts and masturbated.

These aren’t isolated incidents.

According to research from Bowling Green State University, police officers in the U.S. were charged with more than 400 rapes over a 9-year period. During that same time period, 600 police officers were arrested for forcible fondling; 219 were charged with forcible sodomy; 186 were arrested for statutory rape; 58 for sexual assault with an object; and 98 with indecent exposure.

Sexual assault is believed to be the second-most reported form of misconduct against police officers after the use of excessive force, making up more than 9% of all complaints.

Even so, these crimes are believed to be largely underreported so much so that sex crimes may in fact be the number one form of misconduct among police officers.

So why are the numbers underreported? “The women are terrified. Who are they going to call? It’s the police who are abusing them,” said Penny Harrington, the former police chief of Portland, Ore.

One Philadelphia cop threatened to arrest a teenager for carjacking unless she had sex with him. “He had all the power. I had no choice,” testified the girl. “Who was I? He had his badge.”

This is the danger of a police state that invests its henchmen with so much power that they don’t even need to use handcuffs or a gun to get what they want.

Making matters worse, most police departments do little to identify the offenders, and even less to stop them. “Unlike other types of police misconduct, the abuse of police power to coerce sex is little addressed in training, and rarely tracked by police disciplinary systems,” conclude Nancy Phillips and Craig R. McCoy writing for the Philadelphia Inquirer. “This official neglect makes it easier for predators to escape punishment and find new victims.”

Unfortunately, this is a problem that is hiding in plain sight, covered up by government agencies that are failing in their constitutional duties to serve and protect “we the people.”

That thin blue line of knee-jerk adulation and absolute loyalty to police above and beyond what the law requires—a line frequently pushed by President Trump—is creating a menace to society that cannot be ignored.

An investigative report into police misconduct illustrates the pervasiveness of the problem when police go rogue. According to USA Today:

At least 85,000 law enforcement officers across the USA have been investigated or disciplined for misconduct over the past decade… Officers have beaten members of the public, planted evidence and used their badges to harass women. They have lied, stolen, dealt drugs, driven drunk and abused their spouses. Despite their role as public servants, the men and women who swear an oath to keep communities safe can generally avoid public scrutiny for their misdeeds. The records of their misconduct are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside their departments. Police unions and their political allies have worked to put special protections in place ensuring some records are shielded from public view, or even destroyed. Obtained from thousands of state agencies, prosecutors, police departments and sheriffs, the records detail at least 200,000 incidents of alleged misconduct, much of it previously unreported… They include 22,924 investigations of officers using excessive force, 3,145 allegations of rape, child molestation and other sexual misconduct and 2,307 cases of domestic violence by officers.

As researcher Jonathan Blanks notes, “The system is rigged to protect police officers from outside accountability. The worst cops are going to get the most protection.

Hyped up on the power of the badge and their weaponry, protected from charges of wrongdoing by police unions and government agencies, and empowered by rapidly advancing tools—technological and otherwise—that make it all too easy to identify, track and take advantage of vulnerable members of society, predators on the nation’s police forces are growing in number.

“It can start with a police officer punching a woman’s license plate into a police computer – not to see whether a car is stolen, but to check out her picture,” warns investigative journalists Nancy Phillips and Craig R. McCoy. “If they are not caught, or left unpunished, the abusers tend to keep going, and get worse, experts say.”

So where does this leave us?

The courts, by allowing the government’s desire for unregulated, unaccountable, expansive power to trump justice and the rule of law, have turned away from this menace. Politicians, eager for the support of the powerful police unions, have turned away from this menace. Religious leaders who should know better but instead have silenced their moral conscience in order to cozy up to political power have turned away from this menace.

Distracted by political theater, divided by politics, disenfranchised by a legislative and judicial system that renders us powerless in the face of the police state’s many abuses, “we the people” have also turned a blind eye to this menace.

We must stop turning away from this menace in our midst.

For starters, police should not be expected—or allowed—to police themselves.

Misconduct by local police has become a national problem. Therefore, the response to this national problem must start at the local level.

This is no longer a matter of a few bad apples.

The entire system has become corrupted and must be reformed.

Greater oversight is needed, yes, but also greater accountability and more significant consequences for assaults.

Andrea Ritchie’s piece in The Washington Post provides some practical suggestions for reform ranging from small steps to structural changes (greater surveillance of police movements, heightened scrutiny of police interactions and traffic stops, and more civilian oversight boards), but as she acknowledges, these efforts still don’t strike at the root of the problem: a criminal justice system that protects abusers and encourages abuse.

It’s difficult to say whether modern-day policing with its deep-seated corruption, immunity from accountability, and authoritarian approach to law enforcement attracts this kind of deviant behavior or cultivates it, but empowering police to view themselves as the best, or even the only, solution to the public’s problems, while failing to hold them accountable for misconduct, will only deepen the policing crisis that grows deadlier and more menacing by the day.

Skip the Insecticide This Summer. Fight Mosquitoes with Bat Homes

BY JESUS DIAZ
Originally published @ Fast Company

Summer draws nigh, which means it’s mosquito season. You have your usual arsenal of tiki torches, insect repellent oil, electric zapping lamps, and insecticide needed to fight them and the nasty viruses they carry. But there’s a more nature-friendly way to destroy these buzzing annoyances: bats, which can eat up to a 1,000 mosquito-size insects per hour.

That’s what BatBnB wants you to know. The company first took shape in 2016, with some sketches and brainstorming by an Google employee and an architectural designer. Their mission: to turn bats into a pest-control weapon for homeowners by creating nice homes for them that look great in people’s yards. Both founders had experiences with bats when they were kids. One, Christopher Rannefors, grew up building bat houses with his dad in Massachusetts. The other, Harrison Broadhurst, had a mom who was a grade-school biology teacher and used to incorporate bats into her classes.

But even when you explain to people that bats are amazingly effective pest controllers, they may not embrace the creatures on their property. Most people are just scared of bats—you can thank Dracula for that but also just the fact many think of them as rats with wings.

I spoke with Rannefors via email about how people react to their idea of introducing a bat house into their lives. He told me that half the challenge is to convince people to do it in the first place: “Bats are radically misunderstood, threatened, and undervalued for their insect-eating skills,” he told me, “so we are trying to rebrand bats so more people will respect them.”

Because of this stigma—and the destruction of their natural refuges by humans—bats are also increasingly threatened in modern societies and in desperate need of help, he says. He believes that, for each consumer who gets one these houses, a neighbor may join in the fight to keep their families safer while giving bats a way to thrive. Bats also impact the economy: U.S. farmers save more than $24 billion a year in crop damage thanks to these creatures’ presence in agricultural areas.

He believes there are two facets to rebranding bats. One is consumer education about these critters’ abilities and how benign they are to humans once you get past their looks. For that, they partnered with a leading bat expert, biologist, and conservationist, Merlin Tuttle, to promote the virtues of bats among potential buyers.

The other part is design. Rannefors and Broadhurst believe that designing beautiful bat houses will have a halo effect around these critters. “The current bat houses on the market are poorly designed for the animal and looked awful,” he says.

[Photo: courtesy Batbnb]

Made of a variety of sustainable woods, BatBnB’s handcrafted designs have elegant curves that conjure up elegant architecture. Some even feel like something that Frank Lloyd Wright could have created himself had he been a bat fan.

The designs are not only aesthetically pleasing—they are optimized for bats’ biological needs: They feature long flat boxes that you hang on the side of your house, with the bat entrance on their bottom. Inside, milled grooves, optimized for the creatures’ claws, allow them to easily climb and latch comfortably at any height. Bats can choose to rest in cooler or warmer spaces within the house thanks to a series of venting holes drilled on the sides at different intervals. During the day, the bat house soaks up the sunlight, warming its interior nicely without cooking the flying critters and keeping it cozy at all times.

If I weren’t living in a city, I would totally get one. Bats actually remind me of nights of endless summer when I was a kid at my parents’ home, with them buzzing above our heads hunting down mosquitoes like it was the Battle of Britain.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jesus Diaz founded the new Sploid for Gawker Media after seven years working at Gizmodo, where he helmed the lost-in-a-bar iPhone 4 story. He’s a creative director, screenwriter, and producer at The Magic Sauce and a contributing writer at Fast Company.

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Denver Votes to Decriminalize ‘Magic Mushrooms’

By Alexa Lardieri, May 6, 2019

DENVER RESIDENTS WILL vote Tuesday on whether to decriminalize “magic mushrooms,” which contain the psychedelic drug psilocybin.

Initiative Ordinance 301 would decriminalize mushrooms in the city for personal use and possession by people 21 years and older. The initiative states that the city should make personal use and possession its “lowest law-enforcement priority” and “prohibit the city from spending resources to impose criminal penalties.”

The initiative also calls for the creation of the psilocybin mushroom policy review panel to assess and report on the effects of the ordinance.

Currently, the possession of the naturally occurring mushrooms is punishable by a fine, prison or both. Selling the magic mushrooms will still be illegal.

The active compound in magic mushrooms is psilocybin, categorized as a Schedule I substance, the same as heroin and ecstasy. However, the group supporting I-301, Decriminalize Denver, claims that people have been using mushrooms “for thousands of years for healing, rites of passage, spiritual insight, strengthening community and raising consciousness.”

Decriminalize Denver states that people continue to use mushrooms responsibly to improve their mental health and for general well-being. According to the group, the Food and Drug Administration has granted “breakthrough therapy” status to conduct studies on psilocybin-assisted treatment for depression. Other preliminary studies suggest that the compound could be used to treat alcohol and tobacco addiction, depression and anxiety.

Activists in California failed to get a similar initiative on the ballot last year, and supporters in Oregon are hoping to put the matter to a vote statewide in 2020. If successful, Denver would be the first city in the U.S. to legalize mushrooms.

FBI: Sex with Children is the Fastest Growing Illegal Business in America

Source Humans Are Free
by John W. Whitehead , April 25th, 2019

“Children are being targeted and sold for sex in America every day.” — John Ryan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Children, young girls — some as young as 9 years old — are being bought and sold for sex in America. The average age for a young woman being sold for sex is now 13 years old.

This is America’s dirty little secret.

Sex trafficking — especially when it comes to the buying and selling of young girls — has become big business in America, the fastest growing business in organized crime and the second most-lucrative commodity traded illegally after drugs and guns.

As investigative journalist Amy Fine Collins notes, “It’s become more lucrative and much safer to sell malleable teens than drugs or guns. A pound of heroin or an AK-47 can be retailed once, but a young girl can be sold 10 to 15 times a day — and a ‘righteous’ pimp confiscates 100 percent of her earnings.”

Consider this: every two minutes, a child is exploited in the sex industry.

According to USA Today, adults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in the United States.

Who buys a child for sex? Otherwise ordinary men from all walks of life.

“They could be your co-worker, doctor, pastor or spouse,” writes journalist Tim Swarens, who spent more than a year investigating the sex trade in America.

In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 7,200 men (half of them in their 30s) seek to purchase sex with adolescent girls each month, averaging roughly 300 a day.

On average, a child might be raped by 6,000 men during a five-year period of servitude.

It is estimated that at least 100,000 children — girls and boys — are bought and sold for sex in the U.S. every year, with as many as 300,000 children in danger of being trafficked each year. Some of these children are forcefully abducted, others are runaways, and still others are sold into the system by relatives and acquaintances.

“Human trafficking — the commercial sexual exploitation of American children and women, via the Internet, strip clubs, escort services, or street prostitution — is on its way to becoming one of the worst crimes in the U.S.,” said prosecutor Krishna Patel.

This is an industry that revolves around cheap sex on the fly, with young girls and women who are sold to 50 men each day for $25 apiece, while their handlers make $150,000 to $200,000 per child each year.

This is not a problem found only in big cities.

It’s happening everywhere, right under our noses, in suburbs, cities and towns across the nation.

As Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children points out, “The only way not to find this in any American city is simply not to look for it.”

Don’t fool yourselves into believing that this is merely a concern for lower income communities or immigrants.

It’s not.

It is estimated that there are 100,000 to 150,000 under-aged child sex workers in the U.S. These girls aren’t volunteering to be sex slaves. They’re being lured — forced — trafficked into it. In most cases, they have no choice.

In order to avoid detection (in some cases aided and abetted by the police) and cater to male buyers’ demand for sex with different women, pimps and the gangs and crime syndicates they work for have turned sex trafficking into a highly mobile enterprise, with trafficked girls, boys and women constantly being moved from city to city, state to state, and country to country.

For instance, the Baltimore-Washington area, referred to as The Circuit, with its I-95 corridor dotted with rest stops, bus stations and truck stops, is a hub for the sex trade.

No doubt about it: this is a highly profitable, highly organized and highly sophisticated sex trafficking business that operates in towns large and small, raking in upwards of $9.5 billion a year in the U.S. alone by abducting and selling young girls for sex.

Every year, the girls being bought and sold gets younger and younger.

The average age of those being trafficked is 13. Yet as the head of a group that combats trafficking pointed out, “Let’s think about what average means. That means there are children younger than 13. That means 8-, 9-, 10-year-olds.”

“For every 10 women rescued, there are 50 to 100 more women who are brought in by the traffickers. Unfortunately, they’re not 18- or 20-year-olds anymore,” noted a 25-year-old victim of trafficking. “They’re minors as young as 13 who are being traffickedThey’re little girls.”

Where did this appetite for young girls come from?

Look around you.

Young girls have been sexualized for years now in music videos, on billboards, in television ads, and in clothing stores. Marketers have created a demand for young flesh and a ready supply of over-sexualized children.

“All it takes is one look at MySpace photos of teens to see examples — if they aren’t imitating porn they’ve actually seen, they’re imitating the porn-inspired images and poses they’ve absorbed elsewhere,” writes Jessica Bennett for Newsweek.

“Latex, corsets and stripper heels, once the fashion of porn stars, have made their way into middle and high school.”

This is what Bennett refers to as the “pornification of a generation.”

“In a market that sells high heels for babies and thongs for tweens, it doesn’t take a genius to see that sex, if not porn, has invaded our lives,” concludes Bennett.

“Whether we welcome it or not, television brings it into our living rooms and the Web brings it into our bedrooms. According to a 2007 study from the University of Alberta, as many as 90 percent of boys and 70 percent of girls aged 13 to 14 have accessed sexually explicit content at least once.”

In other words, the culture is grooming these young people to be preyed upon by sexual predators. And then we wonder why our young women are being preyed on, trafficked and abused?

Social media makes it all too easy. As one news center reported, “Finding girls is easy for pimps. They look on MySpace, Facebook, and other social networks. They and their assistants cruise malls, high schools and middle schools. They pick them up at bus stops. On the trolley. Girl-to-girl recruitment sometimes happens.”

Foster homes and youth shelters have also become prime targets for traffickers.

Rarely do these girls enter into prostitution voluntarily. Many start out as runaways or throwaways, only to be snatched up by pimps or larger sex rings.

Others, persuaded to meet up with a stranger after interacting online through one of the many social networking sites, find themselves quickly initiated into their new lives as sex slaves.

Debbie, a straight-A student who belonged to a close-knit Air Force family living in Phoenix, Ariz., is an example of this trading of flesh.

Debbie was 15 when she was snatched from her driveway by an acquaintance-friend. Forced into a car, Debbie was bound and taken to an unknown location, held at gunpoint and raped by multiple men. She was then crammed into a small dog kennel and forced to eat dog biscuits.

Debbie’s captors advertised her services on Craigslist. Those who responded were often married with children, and the money that Debbie “earned” for sex was given to her kidnappers.

The gang raping continued.

After searching the apartment where Debbie was held captive, police finally found Debbie stuffed in a drawer under a bed. Her harrowing ordeal lasted for 40 days.

While Debbie was fortunate enough to be rescued, others are not so lucky. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children go missing every year (roughly 2,185 children a day).

With a growing demand for sexual slavery and an endless supply of girls and women who can be targeted for abduction, this is not a problem that’s going away anytime soon.

For those trafficked, it’s a nightmare from beginning to end.

Those being sold for sex have an average life expectancy of seven years, and those years are a living nightmare of endless rape, forced drugging, humiliation, degradation, threats, disease, pregnancies, abortions, miscarriages, torture, pain, and always the constant fear of being killed or, worse, having those you love hurt or killed.

Peter Landesman paints the full horrors of life for those victims of the sex trade in his New York Times article “The Girls Next Door”:

Andrea told me that she and the other children she was held with were frequently beaten to keep them off-balance and obedient. Sometimes they were videotaped while being forced to have sex with adults or one another. Often, she said, she was asked to play roles: the therapist patient or the obedient daughter.

Her cell of sex traffickers offered three age ranges of sex partners — toddler to age 4, 5 to 12 and teens — as well as what she called a “damage group.”

“In the damage group, they can hit you or do anything they want to,” she explained. “Though sex always hurts when you are little, so it’s always violent, everything was much more painful once you were placed in the damage group.”

What Andrea described next shows just how depraved some portions of American society have become.

“They’d get you hungry then train you” to have oral sex. “They put honey on a man. For the littlest kids, you had to learn not to gag. And they would push things in you so you would open up better. We learned responses. Like if they wanted us to be sultry or sexy or scared. Most of them wanted you scared. When I got older, I’d teach the younger kids how to float away so things didn’t hurt.”

Immigration and customs enforcement agents at the Cyber Crimes Center in Fairfax, Va., report that when it comes to sex, the appetites of many Americans have now changed. What was once considered abnormal is now the norm.

These agents are tracking a clear spike in the demand for harder-core pornography on the Internet.

As one agent noted, “We’ve become desensitized by the soft stuff; now we need a harder and harder hit.”

This trend is reflected by the treatment many of the girls receive at the hands of the drug traffickers and the men who purchase them. Peter Landesman interviewed Rosario, a Mexican woman who had been trafficked to New York and held captive for a number of years.

She said: “In America, we had ‘special jobs.’ Oral sex, anal sex, often with many men. Sex is now more adventurous, harder.”

A common thread woven through most survivors’ experiences is being forced to go without sleep or food until they have met their sex quota of at least 40 men. One woman recounts how her trafficker made her lie face down on the floor when she was pregnant and then literally jumped on her back, forcing her to miscarry.

Holly Austin Smith was abducted when she was 14 years old, raped, and then forced to prostitute herself. Her pimp, when brought to trial, was only made to serve a year in prison.

Barbara Amaya was repeatedly sold between traffickers, abused, shot, stabbed, raped, kidnapped, trafficked, beaten, and jailed all before she was 18 years old.

“I had a quota that I was supposed to fill every night. And if I didn’t have that amount of money, I would get beat, thrown down the stairs. He beat me once with wire coat hangers, the kind you hang up clothes, he straightened it out and my whole back was bleeding.”

As David McSwane recounts in a chilling piece for the Herald-Tribune:

“In Oakland Park, an industrial Fort Lauderdale suburb, federal agents in 2011 encountered a brothel operated by a married couple. Inside ‘The Boom Boom Room,’ as it was known, customers paid a fee and were given a condom and a timer and left alone with one of the brothel’s eight teenagers, children as young as 13.

“A 16-year-old foster child testified that he acted as security, while a 17-year-old girl told a federal judge she was forced to have sex with as many as 20 men a night.”

One particular sex trafficking ring catered specifically to migrant workers employed seasonally on farms throughout the southeastern states, especially the Carolinas and Georgia, although it’s a flourishing business in every state in the country.

Traffickers transport the women from farm to farm, where migrant workers would line up outside shacks, as many as 30 at a time, to have sex with them before they were transported to yet another farm where the process would begin all over again.

This growing evil is, for all intents and purposes, out in the open.

Trafficked women and children are advertised on the internet, transported on the interstate, and bought and sold in swanky hotels.

Indeed, as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, the government’s war on sex trafficking — much like the government’s war on terrorism, drugs and crime — has become a perfect excuse for inflicting more police state tactics (police check points, searches, surveillance, and heightened security) on a vulnerable public, while doing little to make our communities safer.

So what can you do?

Educate yourselves and your children about this growing menace in our communities.

Stop feeding the monster: Sex trafficking is part of a larger continuum in America that runs the gamut from homelessness, poverty, and self-esteem issues to sexualized television, the glorification of a pimp/ho culture — what is often referred to as the pornification of America — and a billion dollar sex industry built on the back of pornography, music, entertainment, etc.

This epidemic is largely one of our own making, especially in a corporate age where the value placed on human life takes a backseat to profit. It is estimated that the porn industry brings in more money than Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Yahoo.

Call on your city councils, elected officials and police departments to make the battle against sex trafficking a top priority, more so even than the so-called war on terror and drugs and the militarization of law enforcement.

Stop prosecuting adults for victimless “crimes” such as growing lettuce in their front yard and focus on putting away the pimps and buyers who victimize these young women.

Finally, the police need to do a better job of training, identifying and responding to these issues; communities and social services need to do a better job of protecting runaways, who are the primary targets of traffickers; legislators need to pass legislation aimed at prosecuting traffickers and “johns,” the buyers who drive the demand for sex slaves; and hotels need to stop enabling these traffickers, by providing them with rooms and cover for their dirty deeds.

That so many women and children continue to be victimized, brutalized and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved — except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

But the truth is that we are all guilty of contributing to this human suffering.

The traffickers are guilty.
The consumers are guilty.
The corrupt law enforcement officials are guilty.
The women’s groups who do nothing are guilty.
The foreign peacekeepers and aid workers who contribute to the demand for sex slaves are guilty.

Most of all, every individual who does not raise a hue and cry over the atrocities being committed against women and children in almost every nation around the globe — including the United States — is guilty.

By John W. Whitehead  Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute. His new book Battlefield America: The War on the American People (SelectBooks, 2015) is available at Amazon.com. 

A New Species Of Psychedelic Lichen Found To Contain Psilocybin & DMT

Source Collective Evolution
by Alanna Ketler, October 14, 2016

Lichens are of particular interest to biologists because of their symbiotic relationship between algae and fungi. The fungus creates the network that sustains, hydrates, and protects the algae, which in turn generates the sugars necessary to feed it through photosynthesis. While they both exhibit plant-like characteristics, neither are actually plants — they are composite organisms. This makes the psychedelic lichen even more intriguing.

Scientists have been speculating about this particular lichen for some time. Rigorous testing is needed before researchers can claim anything as fact, however, making anecdotal evidence simply insufficient. And so despite reports from a local tribe about its hallucinogenic qualities, researchers could not positively affirm the lichen to be so, although psilocybin is known to be a psychedelic compound.

How Was This Species of Lichen Discovered?

In 1981, enthobotanists Jim Yost and Wade Davis were doing some fieldwork in the dense rainforests of Ecuador when a local tribe, the Waorani, directed them to the lichen. Yost had previously heard about the existence of the hallucinogenic plant, but it was so rare that he never believed he would actually encounter it, despite having searched for it for seven years. In a paper written in 1983 detailing their discovery, the enthobotanists wrote:

In the spring of 1981, whilst we were engaged in ethnobotanical studies in eastern Ecuador, our attention was drawn to a most peculiar use of hallucinogens by the Waorani, a small isolated group of some 600 Indians. … Amongst most Amazonian tribes, hallucinogenic intoxication is considered to be a collective journey into the subconscious and, as such, is a quintessentially social event.The Waorani, however, consider the use of hallucinogens to be an aggressive anti-social act; so the shaman, or ido, who desires to project a curse takes the drug alone or accompanied only by his wife at night in the secrecy of the forest or in an isolated house.

The lichen was so elusive that even the Waorani people did not possess it. Referring to it as nɇnɇndapɇ, they told the botanists that, while their shamans had once used it, they had not done so in “four generations — approximately eighty years – when ‘bad shaman ate it to send a curse to cause other Waorani to die.’ 

The lichen’s rarity and importance to the tribe encouraged the two to intensify their search efforts, and, almost miraculously, they were soon successful, making them the first Westerners to see the elusive nɇnɇndapɇ. They then proceeded to preserve the unusually unique specimen for future analysis.

What Did the Research Reveal?

Three decades later, the DNA of the lichen was finally analyzed, proving that it was indeed a new species. In 2014, a team of researchers led by Michaela Schmull studied the lichen — also now known as Dictyonema huaorani — and used a technique called liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determine which chemical compounds existed in its tissues. The tests were positive to the presence of psilocybin, tryptamine, 5-meO-DMT, 5-MeOP (5-methoxytryptamine), 5-MEO-NMT and 5-MT.

This composition of chemicals makes this lichen a very interesting and unique specimen indeed. It is the only known species to exist with this specific grouping of substances. Researchers concluded that:

“Due to our inability to use pure reference compounds and scarce amount of sample for compound identification, however, our analyses were not able to determine conclusively the presence of hallucinogenic substances.”

Perhaps in the future when more resources are allocated to the research and funding of such psychedelic substances, we will be able to learn more about their potential health benefits. More and more research is revealing the healing properties of psychedelic substances including marijuana, psilocybin, MDMA, ayahuasca, and LSD. Yet because these substances are generally considered class 1 scheduled drugs (having no therapeutic value), studying them properly is difficult — even though they have shown promising results for treating cancer, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, addiction, anxiety, and more. To learn more about the healing powers of psychedelics, please see the links below.

‘Magic Mushrooms’ Erase Deep Depression in First Human Clinical Trial

This Is What an MDMA Assisted Therapy Session Looks Like

The U.S. Finally Admits Cannabis Kills Cancer Cells

The Truth About LSD: Research Reveals Many Therapeutic & Medicinal Benefits

Much Love

Researchers Demonstrate How Cancer Cells Are Obliterated By Resonant Frequencies

Source Collective Evolution
ByJeffrey Roberts

A new cancer treatment is using resonant frequencies to shatter various types of cancer cells.

In his Tedx Talk, “Shattering Cancer with Resonant Frequencies,” Associate Professor and Director of Music at Skidmore College, Anthony Holland, tells the audience that he has a dream. That dream is to see a future where children no longer have to suffer from the effects of toxic cancer drugs or radiation treatment, and today he and his team believe they have found the answer.

Many of us have likely seen or heard of people shattering glass with the sound of their voice. This amazing feat, Holland explains, is due to a phenomenon called resonant frequency. When someone taps a glass, it emits a natural resonant frequency. To induce shattering, a person must match the resonant frequency of the glass with the vibration of their voice, getting louder and louder until the glass finally breaks.

Taking this phenomenon into account, Holland and a team of researchers wondered if they could induce the same effect in a living microorganism or cell. They came across the work of a Chinese researcher, Dr. Mae-Wan Ho, who conjectured that live cells exhibit similar properties much like liquid crystals do. With this in mind, Holland and his team wondered if they could affect a cell by sending a specific electric signal, much like we do with LCD technology.

After searching the patent database for a device that could accomplish the latter, they came across a therapeutic device invented by a New Mexico physician by the name of Dr. James Bare. The device uses a plasma antenna that pulses on and off, which, as Holland explains, is important because a constant pulse of electricity would produce too much heat and therefore destroy the cell.

For the next 15 months, Holland and his team searched for the exact frequency that would directly shatter a living microorganism. The magic number finally came in the form of two inputs, one high frequency and one low. The high frequency had to be exactly eleven times higher than the low, which in music is known as the 11th harmonic. At this 11th harmonic, micro organisms begin to shatter like crystal glass. advertisement

After practicing until they got efficient at the procedure, Holland began working with a team of cancer researchers in an attempt to destroy targeted cancer cells. First they looked at pancreatic cancer cells, eventually discovering these cells were specifically vulnerable between 100,000 – 300,000 Hz.

Next they moved onto leukemia cells, and were able to shatter the leukemia cells before they could divide. But, as Holland explains in his talk, he needed bigger stats in order to make the treatment a viable option for cancer patients. So what kind of numbers did they produce?

Oscillating pulsed electric field (OPEF) technology is literally shattering targeted cancer cells like crystal glass.

Oscillating pulsed electric field (OPEF) technology is literally shattering targeted cancer cells like crystal glass.

In repeated and controlled experiments, the frequencies, known as oscillating pulsed electric field (OPEF) technology, killed an average of 25% to 40% of leukemia cells, going as high as 60% in some cases. Furthermore, the intervention even slowed cancer cell growth rates up to 65%. It was a double whammy.

The team also found success attacking ovarian cancer cells. Most recently, they tested the treatment against the deadly super bug MRSA, an organism that is resistant to many common antibiotics. Thousands of people die every year from MRSA, Holland explains, and the drugs normally used against the pathogen are known to have toxic side effects. Incredibly, the frequency therapy eliminated antibiotic resistance, and researchers were able to introduce a small amount of antibiotic to kill the bug.

Holland hopes that one day the treatment will override the toxic conventional treatments currently available for patients. At the end of his speech, he describes his vision for the future of cancer clinics:

I believe the future of children’s cancer hospitals will be a different place. They will be a place where children gather and make new friends, they probably wont even know they are sick. They’ll draw pictures, colour in their books, and play with their toys, all the while unaware that above them, a beautiful, blue plasma light is emanating healing, pulsing fields, shattering their cancer, painlessly, and non-toxically, one cell at a time. Thank you.

It’s also noteworthy to mention that in 1920 that Royal Rife first identified the human cancer virus using the world’s most powerful microscope. After identifying and isolating the virus, he decided to culture it on salted pork. At the time this was a very good method for culturing a virus. He then took the culture and injected it into 400 rats which as you might expect, created cancer in all 400 rats very quickly. The next step for Rife is where things took an interesting turn. He later found a frequency of electromagnetic energy that would cause the cancer virus to diminish completely when entered into the energy field. The great discovery led Rife to create a device that could be tuned to output the frequency that would destroy the cancer. He was then able to treat the cancer within both rats and patients who were within close proximity of the device. You can read more of that here.

See Holland’s Tedx Talk below.

Deep State Desperate? Rothschilds Liquidating Royal Heirlooms In Historic Auction

Source – ZeroHedge
by Staff Writer, April 25th, 2019

[UNW Editors Note: the Rothschild family recently got out of the trust business, hinting that they may no longer be as influential on the world stage as they had been for centuries. read more HERE]

The Rothschild banking family is auctioning off furniture and artifacts which once belonged to European monarchies, according to Bloomberg, which calls the July 4th liquidation a “royal summer yard sale.” 

Members of the storied clan, whose extravagant style influenced generations of the mega-rich, consigned about 57 lots to Christie’s July 4 auction in London. The trove is estimated at about 10 million pounds ($12.9 million). –Bloomberg

“There’s something mythical about the Rothschilds that’s attached to whatever they owned,” said New York interior designer Robert Couturier. “They created their own world of taste and elegance. There’s an abandon of luxury that few other families had.” 

The ‘crown jewels’ of the collection are a pair of Flemish-made giltwood cabinets commissioned by King Philip V of Spain around the year 1713. They’re estimated to bring in 1.5 to 2.5 million pounds ($1.9 – $3.2 million US).

 Philip V cabinets (photo: Christie’s)

Also up for sale is a mahogany writing desk crafted for Marie Antoinette around 1780 by Jean Henri Riesener, whose work exemplified the “Louis XVI” style. Reisener was paid by the French Crown “with a lavishness unknown since the days of Louis XIV,” receiving some 900,000 livres between 1775 – 1784 (roughly $23 million USD) while he was also working for private clients. 

The desk may fetch as much as 1 million pounds ($1.3 million USD), according to the report. 

Jean Henri Riesener​​​​​

The lavish style is known as le gout Rothschild and became the hallmark of the American Gilded Age, influencing the Rockefellers, Astors and Vanderbilts. The family was known to buy only the best of what was on the market. After the French Revolution in 1789, many pieces from the Palace of Versailles entered their collection.  –Bloomberg

A rectangular parcel-gilt, gilt-bronze and rock-crystal casket, Venetian, circa 1600. Estimate: £100,000-150,000. Offered in Masterpieces from a Rothschild Collection on 4 July at Christie’s London

That said, the ornate aesthetic of many of the pieces has fallen somewhat out of fashion, according to the report, which notes that people pay more for a picture of the ‘Kimpsons,’ such as this one which sold for $2.6 million to a young Chinese buyer. 

UNTITLED (KIMPSONS #3), 2003 — Sold for $2.6 million on April 1, 2019

“Taste changes. Times change. Houses change,” said Couturier. “It is an era that has definitely passed.” 

That said, the Rothschild name should appeal to plenty of Christie’s clients, particularly in Europe – according to the auction house’s head of European furniture, Paul Gallois. Also interested are buyers from Russia, Asia and the Middle East. 

Another featured item is artist Jean-Honore Fragonard’s Dans les bles, which is estimated at 700,000 to 1 million pounds ($900,000 – $1.3 million USD) – though it appears to have failed to sell at Sotheby’s in 2015 for more than twice as much – as well as an 18th century sundial believed to have been commissioned by King Louis XV, estimated at 60,000 – 80,000 pounds ($77,000 – $103,000).

 Dans les bles

The Rothschilds don’t sell often, Gallois said. In 2015, Eric de Rothschild sold a pair of Rembrandt portraits to the governments of France and the Netherlands for $180 million. The collection of barons Nathaniel and Albert von Rothschild was sold by Christie’s in 1999, with a royal commode by Riesener fetching 7 million pounds. It’s now on view at Versailles, according to Christie’s. –Bloomberg

Christie’s has not disclosed which Rothschild family members are selling in July. 

“Most of the houses were filled with such splendors,” said Couturier. “They could come from any of the Rothschilds’ homes.”

Separate of the auction, the Louvre has agreed to buy Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Standard Bearer (1636) from the Rothschilds for an undisclosed sum, after France declared it to be a “national treasure.” The museum has 30 months to find the necessary funds, accordsing to The Art Newspaper

When Jacob James de Rothschild bought The Standard Bearer for £840 in 1840 at a Christie’s sale in London, it was perhaps the earliest purchase of a Rembrandt by a member of the banking family. The work was inherited by his son Edmond de Rothschild, who donated a collection of 40,000 prints and 3,000 drawings to the Louvre, including a selection of Rembrandt’s etchings and drawings, in 1935. The painting, which was previously in the collection of the English monarch King George IV, now belongs to the children of Élie de Rothschild, who died in 2007. –The Art Newspaper

Rembrandt’s The Standard Bearer (1636) Image via Wikicommons

America’s Fraudulent Organics Industry: 40% of All Organic Food Tested Positive for Prohibited Pesticides

Originally published @ HEALTH IMPACT NEWS
By Alliance for Natural Health, April 26th, 2019

We thought the problem was limited to fraudulent overseas suppliers; but fake organics are also grown in the US, and the USDA is clueless. Action Alert!

A Missouri farmer has been charged with ripping off food companies and consumers by falsely marketing more than $140 million worth of corn, soybeans, and wheat as organic.

Observers have called the scale of this fraud “jaw dropping” and likely the largest case of its kind involving US farmers.

The level of deception in the organic industry has reached epidemic proportions: a USDA study found that 40% of all organic food sold in the US tested positive for prohibited pesticides.

This is an outrage, but the USDA shows no signs of deviating from business as usual.

The long-running scheme started as far back as 2004, when the Missouri man, Randy Constant, allegedly recruited three Nebraska farmers to supply him with crops. The Nebraska farmers turned a blind eye to Constant’s false marketing because of the premium prices their crops were fetching. The Nebraska farmers pleaded guilty last October.

This episode highlights what we’ve been saying for months now: the USDA, who is responsible for ensuring the integrity of the organic label, is absolutely inept.

First, we had fake organics flooding in from overseas. We were told the problem was with foreign certifiers and that more oversight over the supply chain would reduce the fraud.

But now it appears the problem is much deeper, and the USDA simply lacks the will to enforce the law. How else could such large-scale fraud occur on American soil over the course of a decade?

In fact, it wasn’t even the USDA that discovered the fraud; it was reportedly detected by a buyer after the grain he bought tested positive for GMOs.

We don’t know precisely where the oversight process broke down. The USDA does not perform inspections of organic producers; that is supposed to be taken care of by USDA-accredited, third-party organic certifiers.

Farmers submit an organic system plan to a certifier, describing the methods used on the farm to produce organic crops. Certifiers review the plan and, if approved, are supposed to perform annual inspections which may include residue testing to ensure organic crops have not come into contact with prohibited substances.

Judging from the fraud coming from overseas from certifiers like ETKO, it seems likely that these third-party organic certifiers are also in on the fraud.

What does the USDA’s organic seal mean anymore if the game can be rigged so easily? How many more farmers or businesses are similarly capitalizing on the premium for organic crops without adhering to organic standards? Does the USDA even care?

Take action below and tell the USDA to take steps to address organic fraud.

Action Alert! Write to the USDA and Congress, telling them that the level of organic fraud going on is an outrage, and major steps must be taken to address it. Please send your message immediately.

Read the full article at Alliance for Natural Health.


Who Owns Organics infographic from The Cornucopia Institute.

The first wave of acquisitions of organic processors was concentrated between December, 1997 and October, 2002.  This period coincides with the initial release of the draft USDA organic standards and its full implementation in October, 2002. A second wave of acquisitions in the organic sector has been occurring since 2012. Surprisingly few major corporate agribusinesses note ownership ties on their acquisitions’ product labels.

Dr. Phil Howard, an Associate Professor in the Department of Community Sustainability at Michigan State and author of the infographic above, has identified some significant updates to his Who Owns Organic Chart, including:

  • December 2018: Nestle-Osem divested Tribe (sold to Lakeview Farms)
  • November 2018: Kraft Heinz acquired Primal Kitchen for $200M
  • September 2018: Kraft Heinz acquired Ethical Bean Coffee
  • June 2018: Tyson acquired Tecumseh Poultry/Smart Chicken; ConAgra acquired Pinnacle Foods (Earth Balance/Udi’s/Evol) for $10.9B
  • May 2018: Pepsi acquired Bare Foods
  • February 2018: Danone’s venture division invested in Harmless Harvest coconut water; Nestlé acquired majority stake in Terrafertil/Nature’s Heart
  • December 2017: Campbell Soup Co. acquired Snyder’s-Lance for $4.87B
  • November 2017: Unilever acquired Tazo Tea (from Starbucks) for $384M; Nestlé acquired Chameleon Cold-Brew
  • September 2017: Nestlé acquired Sweet Earth and a 68% stake in Blue Bottle Coffee; B&G acquired Back to Nature (from Brynwood Partners and Mondelēz) for $162.5M; Unilever acquired Pukka Herbs
  • July 2017: Lactalis announced it would acquire Stonyfield from Danone for $875 M; Campbell Soup Co. acquired Pacific Foods for $700 M; AB InBev acquired Hiball
  • June 2017: Dean Foods acquired Uncle Matt’s Organic
  • Dean Foods acquired minority stake in Good Karma
  • April 2017: Unilever acquired Sir Kensington’s
  • February 2017: Maple Leaf Foods (#43) acquired Lightlife Foods from Brynwood Partners
  • December 2016: B&G Foods (#95) acquired Victoria Fine Foods
  • November 2016: Pilgrim’s Pride (#18, but 76% owned by #4 JBS) acquired The GNP Company (Just BARE chicken) for $350 M; Dean Foods and Organic Valley form a 50/50 joint venture; Pepsi acquired KeVita; Dr. Pepper Snapple Group acquired Bai for $1.7 B
  • July 2016: Danone announced it would acquire WhiteWave for $12.5 B. Deal completed with the condition that Stonyfield be sold in April 2017
  • June 2016: Coca-Cola acquired minority stake in Aloe Gloe; Kellogg acquired Pure Organic
  • May 2016: Hormel acquired Justin’s (nut butters) for $286 M
  • March 2016: Pulmuone acquired Vitasoy/Nasoya for $50 M
  • General Mills investments via its “301 Inc.” venture capital arm include the following: $1.25 M in Tio Gazpacho in March 2016, $2.1 M in Good Culture in March 2016 (+$3 M in September 2016), $18M in Kite Hill in May 2016, additional $6 M in Rhythm Superfoods in January 2017, $6.5 M in Farmhouse Culture in March 2017, and $3 M in Purely Elizabeth in April 2017

The Cornucopia Institute