Category Archives: 2nd Amendment

Despite Government and Mainstream Media Demonization the 3D-Printed Gun Business is Booming

By Matt Agorist

Since before he was elected, president Joe Biden has promised more gun control, and he is doing everything in his power to keep this one promise — up to and including executive action — specifically targeting 3D printing of guns. Or, as Biden refers to them, Ghost Guns.

The term “ghost gun” is meant to incite fear and is used by the anti-gun crowd as a slogan to sway the ignorant away from the fact that law-abiding citizens often customize their legal weapons with parts obtained online or manufactured in their homes. Some of the parts are drilled with machine tools or 3D printed and therefore do not have a serial number so it is harder for government to track the weapons. Biden will make this legal activity for law-abiding gun owners — illegal.

However, as the Fast and Furious scandal — which happened under Biden’s tenure as VP — shows us, serial numbers on guns don’t stop anyone from committing crimes. The US gave serialized weapons to cartels, who in turn used them on Americans.

For generations, advocates of private gun ownership have been fighting exhaustively through political channels to protect their right to keep and bear arms. Gun owners even have one of the strongest lobby groups in Washington, the highly disappointing NRA. Yet over the years, gun rights continue to diminish in America, despite the constant political campaigns by the NRA and politicians who claim to support gun rights.

However, in the past few years, one guy with a good idea has managed to do more to protect gun rights than the NRA has in decades of political involvement. Cody Wilson is the founder of “Defense Distributed” and the “Wikiweapon” project, which allows anyone with a 3D printer to create their own untraceable gun in the privacy of their own home.

While alarmists claim that 3D-printed guns will be the end of humanity, the fact is that these plans have been online on torrent and dark web sites for years and we’ve yet to see an onslaught of violence with them.

What’s more, as the gruesome murder-suicide on a college campus in Walnut Creek, California illustrated is that people don’t even need these plans or 3D printers if they want to make their own untraceable gun. Scott Bertics built the gun he used to shoot himself and Clare Orton without anyone knowing and entirely through legal measures.

Psychopaths who want to cause harm to others will cause harm to others using any means necessary. Limiting the ability for law-abiding citizens to protect themselves will never change this.

Wilson makes no secret that the intention behind distributing CAD files to create homemade guns is to make gun control measures obsolete and bolster the Second Amendment, which is under continual assault from anti-gun activists.

Naturally, this has put a target on his back. This week, Forbes published an interview with Wilson, in which they referred to him as the “World’s Most Dangerous Crypto Anarchist.”

Forbes paints Wilson as some evil shadowy figure who pines away in the darkness waiting to unleash terror on the world. But in reality, Wilson is an entrepreneur who has helped make self-defense, open source.

Forbes cites statistics from the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives, which claims that from 2016 through 2020, some 23,906 suspected ghost guns were recovered from crime scenes, including 325 homicides or attempted homicides.

But, as mentioned above, these weapons are likely not 3D printed and instead are ordered as parts from various places on the internet or had their serial numbers rubbed off. Nothing is inherently immoral about building these guns either, but the feds, and Forbes, attempting to use “ghost guns” to fear monger, completely ignores the intent behind them.

In Chicago, in 2021 alone, there were 783 murders and an additional 3,592 shootings, none of which were carried out with 3D-printed or constructed weapons. During the same time period, millions of people downloaded 3D blueprints for guns and Wilson generated nearly $5 million from his company Defense Distributed.

The 3D gun business is booming and it’s not leading to massive terror attacks.

Wilson’s company sells subscriptions to his Legio site where members pay between $5 and $8 per month, giving them access to 16,000 files for making firearm and gun components. He also sells 3D printers specifically designed to circumvent the state-sponsored gun control. Coupled with his new software, dubbed the “Zero Percenter” — because it can turn a completely untouched piece of aluminum into a firearm — Defense Distributed products are a means of leveling the playing field.

“They are literally trying to control the world. But as the Zero Percenter demonstrates, blocks of metal are also guns,” Wilson told Forbes.

In short, Wilson’s small business is thriving, and largely in part thanks to the federal government’s crackdown on gun rights. Despite fear mongering from the mainstream media and the like, 3D-printed guns are a boon to liberty and will only serve to foster freedom around the world.

This is because guns — in the hands of good people — level the playing field against guns in the hands of bad people. It is this simple. Just imagine the power a 3D-printed gun would give a mother in an African village as warlords come through hacking off the limbs of children with machetes. With enough of the villagers having these guns, they could effectively defend themselves against large groups of tyrants even if they had automatic weapons.

Sadly, mainstream media, as illustrated in this Forbes piece, as well as statists, only see the potentially negative aspects of these 3D-printed guns.

This protectionist attitude is self-serving and one-sided and ignores the benefits of an armed society as well as history. And, it only serves to further the oppression of those who cannot defend themselves.

While it would certainly be an amazing thought to be able to live in a world without guns, that is simply not the case. Until it is the case, anyone who wants to defend themselves and their family, should be able to do so in any manner they see fit — including making their own 3D gun — as the only other option is tyranny.

Source: The Free Thought Project

The Atlantic Claims ‘More People Carrying Guns Tends to Result in More Shootings.’ Decades of Data Show They’re Wrong

Jon Miltimore
December 22, 2021

Editors Note: This article contains the author’s opinion.

A couple of months ago, The Atlantic published an article written by staff writer David A. Graham that explores the surge of violence the United States experienced in 2020.

Overall the article, which analyzes findings from the FBI’s “Uniform Crime Report,” is quite good. It effectively breaks down what we know and—more importantly—what we don’t know about the latest crime trends in America, which in 2020 saw a record surge in the murder rate amid a broader rise of violence.

On one particular point, however, Graham is simply wrong.

Graham notes that sales of firearms jumped in 2020, as did police confiscation of illegal guns, and he attempts to tie this to the surge in violence.

“You can ask law-abiding people or you can ask people who do not abide by the law, ‘Why are you armed with a firearm?’ ‘I need to protect myself,’” Richard Rosenfeld, a criminologist at the University of Missouri at St. Louis, tells Graham.

Precisely what Rosenfeld meant by this statement is unclear, but Graham’s next sentence is clear.

“That creates a vicious cycle: More people carrying guns tends to result in more shootings, which in turn heightens the desire to carry a weapon for protection,” Graham writes. “When crime is decreasing, this dynamic helps it continue to fall, but once it begins to rise, the feedback loop turns ugly.”

Whether this claim is Graham’s or Rosenfield’s is unclear. No link or citation is offered to support the assertion. What we do know is the claim that “more people carrying guns tends to result in more shootings” is simply untrue.

As economist Mark Perry pointed out several years ago, the US saw gun violence steadily decrease over multiple decades as gun ownership surged.

“According to data retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control, there were 7 firearm-related homicides for every 100,000 Americans in 1993 (see light blue line in chart),” Perry wrote. “By 2013…the gun homicide rate had fallen by nearly 50% to only 3.6 homicides per 100,000 population. ”

This decline, Perry points out, occurred as the number of privately owned firearms in America surged from about 185 million in 1993 to 357 million in 2013.

And in case you’re wondering, non-fatal shootings followed a similar decline as fatal shootings, as Vox reported at the time. This is part of a larger decline in gun violence that saw “a 39 percent decline in gun homicides between 1993 and 2011 and a staggering 69 percent decline in non-fatal firearms crimes.”

Mr. Graham, who has also reported for Newsweek and The Wall Street Journal, is no doubt a fine writer and reporter. (Many of his points in the article on the FBI’s recent crime report are insightful.) But he’s simply wrong that more people possessing guns “tends to result in more shootings.” The data simply do not support this claim. During this “staggering” decades-long trend of falling firearms crimes, gun ownership steadily increased the entire time.

None of this is to say that gun ownership caused the decline in gun violence. It very well may have, but that’s a more difficult question to answer. For instance, Max Ehrenfreund, a Harvard scientist, has posited that the decline in gun violence may have stemmed from a decline in alcoholism, more police working the streets, the bullish economy of the Reagan years, and even less lead exposure.

Ehrenfreund says researchers don’t really know for certain why the decline in violence happened, but he said one thing is clear: “America has become a much less violent place.”

The decline in gun violence was no doubt linked to many factors, but it’s certainly possible the rise of gun ownership was one of them.

As Lawrence Reed has pointed out, compelling research shows guns prevent some 2.5 million crimes a year in America—6,849 every day—nearly a half million of which are of a life-threatening nature. And it’s not exactly hard to see why. After all, 60 percent of convicted felons told researchers that they avoided committing such crimes when they suspected the target was armed.

If you’re suspicious of these statistics, it’s worth noting that the Centers for Disease Control, in a report commissioned by President Obama following the 2012 Sandy Hook Massacre, estimated that crimes prevented by guns may be even higher: up to 3 million annually (8,200 per day).

Again, we don’t know for certain. These are estimates. What we do know is that guns aren’t just used to commit crimes; they are also used to stop and deter crimes.

In his famous essay That Which is Seen, and That Which is Not Seen, the great economist Frédéric Bastiat noted there is a pervasive tendency for people to focus on the visible effects of a given policy or action and miss the unseen consequences.

Gun control proponents often make this mistake. They focus on crimes committed with guns (the seen)—some of which are truly the things of nightmares—but ignore all the unseen, all of the crimes prevented by firearms.

Some may not be prepared to accept the idea that guns prevent thousands of crimes in America every single day. That’s ok.

But The Atlantic should correct its claim that “more people carrying guns tends to result in more shootings.” It’s pure fiction.