Gold, Silver and the Federal Reserve: a Transitioning Economy

Ryan DeLarme
July 27th,2020

While the world is currently filled with no shortage of crises that hold our daily attention, something even bigger than most folks can even imagine has been taking place in the background. The current Administration, in tandem with countless others, has taken the bull by the horns and nationalized the Federal Reserve banking system, essentially neutering the central bank cartel. They are building an entirely new economy, which will likely be backed by sound money. In fact, evidence heavily suggests that we are already deep in the transitional phase. You’d think the banksters and their corporatocracy would have activated all assets against Trump by now, right? Oh, wait a minute..

Understanding the Federal Reserve Cartel: Our Unelected Leaders

Who owns the private corporation that controls our economy? Well you got your Goldman Sachs, Rockefellers, Lehmans and Kuhn Loebs of New York; the Rothschilds of Paris and London; the Warburgs of Hamburg; the Lazards of Paris; and the Israel Moses Seifs of Rome. Many of the bank’s stockholders reside in Europe.

The US government had a historical distrust of BIS, lobbying unsuccessfully for its demise at the 1944 post-WWII Bretton Woods Conference. Instead the Eight Families’ power was exacerbated, with the Bretton Woods creation of the IMF and the World Bank. This is also when we went off the Gold Standard for good.

The Four Horsemen of Banking (Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup and Wells Fargo) own the Four Horsemen of Oil (Exxon Mobil, Royal Dutch/Shell, BP and Chevron Texaco); in tandem with Deutsche Bank, BNP, Barclays and other European old money behemoths. But their monopoly over the global economy does not end at the edge of the oil patch.

Companies under Rockefeller control include Exxon Mobil, Chevron Texaco, BP Amoco, Marathon Oil, Freeport McMoran, Quaker Oats, ASARCO, United, Delta, Northwest, ITT, International Harvester, Xerox, Boeing, Westinghouse, Hewlett-Packard, Honeywell, International Paper, Pfizer, Motorola, Monsanto, Union Carbide and General Foods, writes Dean Henderson at The Herland Report and Free21. In modern times this would also include most of the technocracy [Google, Facebook, Youtube, etc.]

According to company 10K filings to the SEC, the Four Horsemen of Banking are among the top ten stock holders of virtually every Fortune 500 corporation.

So who then are the stockholders in these money center banks?

This information is guarded much more closely. Queries to bank regulatory agencies regarding stock ownership in the top 25 US bank holding companies are given Freedom of Information Act status, before being denied on “national security” grounds. This is rather ironic, since many of the bank’s stockholders reside in Europe.

Almost every country, including the United States, is snared in a Central Banking trap of fiat money and fractional reserve banking. Fiat currency is defined as “money that is intrinsically useless; is used only as a medium of exchange.” The value of money is set by the supply and demand for money and the supply and demand for other goods and services in the economy. The prices for those goods and services, including gold and silver, are allowed to fluctuate based on market forces. 

The seemingly endless stream of fiat currency from fractional reserve banking has also been a wonderful tool, whoever controls the magic money making wand essentially controls the Government. Here in the US that control lays in the hands of a privately owned corporation called the Federal Reserve, it’s board members and those they serve could be seen as “Unelected leaders”. These people control the flow of cash, and with it they control any politician who lacks a conscience, typically by funding them into office.

If we simply returned to a gold standard, we could POTENTIALLY remove the mechanism of power and control held by criminality in the highest places.

The Return of Gold and Silver

It has long been dismissed as a fool’s errand, on par with abandoning the Federal Reserve and other trappings of the modern economy. Mainstream economists deride it almost without exception. Reintroducing the gold standard would “be a disaster for any large advanced economy,” says the University of Chicago’s Anil Kashyap, who connects enthusiasm for it with “macroeconomic illiteracy.” His colleague, Nobel laureate Richard Thaler, struggles with its very underlying principle: “Why tie to gold? Why not 1982 Bordeaux?”

Yet the idea that every US dollar should be backed by a small amount of actual gold is more popular than economists’ opinions might suggest. Advocates include members of Congress and president Donald Trump. Enthusiasm for a return to the gold standard has become more prominent since Trump’s most recent nominees to fill the vacant Federal Reserve governorship have endorsed a return. The first two—Herman Cain and Stephen Moore—both dropped out of consideration, but the third, economist Judy Shelton, announced recently in a Trump tweet, may be the most ardent in her support.

Last year, Shelton called for a “new Bretton Woods conference,” akin to the 1944 meeting that established the post-war economic order, perhaps to be held at Mar-a-Lago, where a return to the gold standard could be considered. “We make America great again by making America’s money great again,” she wrote in the journal of the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank.

Since 2011, at least six states have passed laws recognizing gold and silver as currency; another three are presently contemplating bills of their own. The surprising success of Ron Paul, a Texas Republican Congressman and ardent gold bug, in the 2008 and 2012 elections showed the potency of these ideas among the electorate. In its 2012 and 2016 campaign platforms, the Republican Party called for a commission to investigate the viability of a return to a gold standard system. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives passed a bill including such a commission in both 2015 and 2017, but both times the proposals died in the Senate. Last year, Alexander Mooney, a Republican representative from West Virginia, took that a step further when he introduced a bill proposing a full-on return to the gold standard. (The bill has no cosponsors and, unsurprisingly, has gone nowhere.)

Today, with inflation unusually low and stable, the gold standard is a tougher sell than it once was. But as trust in American institutions wanes, there is renewed support for money backed by something tangible, not the say-so of the government. If inflation picks up once again, a solid base of gold standard evangelists is ready to take it mainstream. That a supporter of the gold standard may yet wind up on the Fed’s board of governors is yet more evidence that the idea’s prospects are shining brighter than they have in many years .

How the gold standard works

Money depends on trust—the faith that it will hold its value so that, when the time comes to spend it, it will be accepted without question in exchange for what the holder expects it to be worth. Inflation eats away at that value. 

In modern times, governments are often a culprit behind inflation. Since they enjoy a monopoly on printing money, they can issue new currency at virtually no cost. But governments are run by vote-seeking politicians, who might print more money to juice short-term growth needed to win re-election, inadvertently causing inflation to flare up later. This quandary isn’t theoretical, and has happened with surprising frequency throughout history. To cite a recent, prominent example, US president Richard Nixon bent to this temptation (pdf) during his 1972 re-election campaign—contributing to the breakout of inflation that ravaged the American economy throughout the 1970s and early 1980s.

There’s a seemingly easy fix: Take the power of money creation out of the hands of politicians. According to the monetarist theory popularized by economist Milton Friedman in the 1970s, preventing inflation requires fixing the supply of money. The gold standard, by limiting the dollars the government can print to the weight of gold it holds in reserves, is one way of doing so.

The US adopted the gold standard in 1879, when Congress finally followed Britain, Germany, France, and other advanced nations. By holding national currencies stable against gold, the international embrace of the gold standard encouraged foreign investment and facilitated trade, giving rise to the first era of intense globalization.

Here’s a very cartoonish version of how it worked: The US Treasury agreed to redeem a set weight of gold in exchange for a fixed number of dollars, and vice versa. During the classical gold standard era—from 1879 to 1914 in the US—one troy ounce of gold fetched $21.

The gold standard’s discipline came from the fact that the government had to be sure it held the necessary volume of gold in reserve, in case anyone wanted to exchange dollars for a set amount of the shiny metal. If it printed more money than it held in gold reserves, the state risked hyperinflation or causing a financial crisis by shattering faith in the solidity of its currency.

In theory, the gold standard, therefore, limits government spending to only what it can raise in taxes or borrow against its gold reserve, and prevents it from simply printing money to pay its debts. It also takes power over the money supply away from central bankers. Indeed, it might render central banks mostly unnecessary. Bear in mind that for most of the classical gold standard era, the US didn’t have a central bank, which was introduced in 1913.

Signs of the “Transitional Economy”

Since President Trump has come into office he started to set this up, he got rid of the TTP, put Tariffs on China, reworked NAFTA, began deregulation’s (roughly 25’000 regulations!), working with India and other allies to decouple from China, helping BREXIT with trade deals outside of the EU, the list goes on and on and would be unrealistic to be comprehensive here as each week we see more evidence. The Senate Judicial committee has given the green light to Judy Shelton to be on the board of directors. Shelton’s been very vocal about the switch to sound money, and part of her plan was to absorb the FED into the national treasury, returning the power to the United States and not it’s international bankster progenitors.

The NYT (a globalist propaganda rag, track back to the CFR and other elite international think-tanks) was quick to seed people with doubt against her, reporting:

“…One question that analysts are pondering is what version of Miss Shelton will show up to work at the FED if she gets the job? A Gold Standard proponent or not? A supporter of lower rates, as she has been during Trumps administration or an inflation hawk?”

-New York Times

They seem concerned about what she is going to do, and they probably should be. We will be covering this going forward as it is a huge crux in the silent war. Keep an eye on Gold and Silver.

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